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15 organizations that help the world

With the myriad difficulties that face the world, it is essential to have organizations making the planet a better place. Without such generous assistance, the world would be plagued with unmanageable adversities. The following is a list of 15 organizations that help improve the world with their innovative ideas and generous efforts.

  1. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
    The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is an organization that works to fight hunger and its consequential effects on a global scale. It works specifically to eradicate infectious diseases and child mortality rates in struggling countries.
  1. Doctors Without Borders
    Doctors Without Borders delivers emergency aid to people in need. These efforts include helping people in situations of natural disasters, epidemics and lack of health care.
  1. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO)
    The FAO’s prime purpose is to defeat hunger. It works in 130 countries worldwide to help ensure people have access to food and are not going hungry. The organization has been fighting hunger since 1945.
  1. Human Rights Watch
    Human Rights Watch was established in 1978 and is an organization that reports on human rights conditions in countries all over the world. With its findings, it meets with governments and financial corporations to urge for policy changes that assist the betterment of human rights around the world.
  1. Oxfam
    Oxfam is a global organization that helps improve the world through poverty-reduction efforts. It focuses on the conditions that cause poverty and works to fix the effects of such difficulties. Its efforts include disaster response, programs to help people afflicted by poverty and education improvement.
  1. Red Cross
    Founded in 1881, the Red Cross foundation works to help people in urgent need. Assisted greatly by volunteers, the Red Cross mainly provides disaster relief, support to America’s military families, health and safety services, blood donations and international services.
  1. Save the Children
    Save the Children is a nonprofit organization that focuses primarily on helping children in need. This includes emergency response, global health initiatives, HIV and Aids prevention, disaster response and creating educational opportunities. In 2016, Save the Children reached and assisted 157 million children.
  1. The Borgen Project
    The Borgen Project is a nonprofit organization that aims to end poverty by working to make poverty a focus of U.S. foreign policy. The organization is an influential ally for the world’s poor that educates and mobilizes people to communicate with their Congressional leaders to ensure funding for poverty-fighting efforts are not eliminated. In 2017, the organization had volunteers in 754 U.S. cities and is one of the 15 organizations that help improve the world immensely.
  1. The World Bank
    The World Bank works with other organizations to provide extensive financial assistance to developing countries. It was established in 1944 and has more than 10,000 employees and 120 offices worldwide.
  1. United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
    The UNDP is an organization that aims to eradicate poverty. It implements this goal by developing policies, skills and partnerships to enable people to sustain their progress and improvement. The UNDP is in over 170 countries and territories.
  1. United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
    UNICEF is an organization that fights for children’s rights to shelter, nutrition, protection and equality. It does so by being children’s advocates and providing humanitarian assistance to children and their families, most often in developing countries.
  1. United States Agency for International Development (USAID)
    USAID is an international agency that provides development assistance to countries in need. It works to advance U.S. national security and “economic prosperity” by promoting self-sufficiency. It uses humanitarian response efforts to bring disaster relief and supplies to those who are struggling.
  1. World Food Programme (WFP)
    WFP’s mission is to fight world hunger and provide people around the world the quality food they need to survive. It does this by working with U.S. policymakers and other foundations to organize financial resources, as well as develop necessary policies to assist the fight against worldwide hunger.
  1. World Health Organization (WHO)
    Of the 15 organizations that help improve the world, WHO is among the largest. The WHO is an organization that works directly with governments and various partners to ensure a healthier future for people all around the world. It fights infectious diseases and works directly with mothers and children to improve and maintain their health.
  1. World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF)
    The WWF is an international nongovernmental organization working to conserve nature and reduce extreme threats. It also aims to increase awareness to prevent further damage to the earth and its inhabitants.

These are only 15 organizations that help improve the world. There are many more that work together with partners to help make the world a better and safer place to live. Their generosity helps people on a daily basis live healthier and happier lives, and it is troublesome to think of where the world would be without such assistance.

– McCall Robison

Photo: Flickr


Weston_Volunteer_Openings
Interested in public policy advocacy to improve the lives of the world’s poor? The Borgen Project is currently hiring in Weston, Massachusetts for a variety of telecommute roles, all of which include advocacy for foreign policy change that will help those living in poverty.

The Borgen Project is a nonprofit organization that raises awareness of and works with our nation’s leaders to alleviate the problems caused by global poverty. We advocate on the national level for foreign policies that will better the lives of the world’s poor. For more information on the volunteer opportunities available in Weston, please see the list of openings below.

 

Weston Volunteer Openings

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Greensboro_Volunteer_OpportunitiesDo you live in Greensboro and wonder what you can do to improve your community and world? If so, the options below that help make a difference in the world might interest you.

The best way to find volunteer opportunities in Greensboro is through VolunteerMatch, a volunteer search engine that can be set specifically for Greensboro allows you to pick the dates you want, type of work you are interested in and what areas are the best for you.

However, if you are looking for a way to make a difference in the global atmosphere while working in Greensboro, The Borgen Project is the place for you.

The Borgen Project is looking for flexible volunteers who are passionate about decreasing global poverty. The Borgen Project works on the political level, while also advocating to those around us to increase awareness. To achieve change, volunteers are vital to the organization.

The positions below are currently open for volunteers.

 

Greensboro Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week

Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.

Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week

This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

z1 splash
Do you live in Fargo, North Dakota and wonder what you can do to improve your community and world? If so, the options below that help make a difference in the world might interest you.

If you are looking for a way to make a difference in the global atmosphere while working in Fargo, The Borgen Project is the place for you.

The Borgen Project is looking for flexible volunteers who are passionate about decreasing global poverty. The Borgen Project works on the political level, while also advocating to those around us to increase awareness. To achieve change, volunteers are vital to the organization.

The positions below are currently open for volunteers.

 

Fargo Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week

Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.

Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week

This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]


South_Beach_Volunteer_Openings
Want to get involved in combating the effects of global poverty from South Beach, Florida? The Borgen Project, a nonprofit organization focusing on advocacy for the world’s poor, is hiring in South Beach for a number of telecommute opportunities.

Join a team of volunteers and interns across the country interested in mobilizing for change in foreign policy! For more information on the opportunities available in South Beach, please review the descriptions of positions below.

 

South Beach Volunteer Openings

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]


College_Station_Volunteer_Opportunities
Do you live in College Station, Texas and wonder what you can do to improve your community and world? If so, the options below that help make a difference in the world might interest you.

The best way to find volunteer opportunities in College Station is through VolunteerMatch, a volunteer search engine that can be set specifically for College Station. It allows you to pick the dates you want, type of work you are interested in and what areas are the best for you.

However, if you are looking for a way to make a difference in the global atmosphere while working in College Station, The Borgen Project is the place for you.

The Borgen Project is looking for flexible volunteers who are passionate about decreasing global poverty. The Borgen Project works on the political level, while also advocating to those around us to increase awareness. To achieve change, volunteers are vital to the organization.

The positions below are currently open for volunteers.

 

College Station Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week

Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.

Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week

This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Savannah_Volunteer_Opportunities
Looking for opportunities to help out with The Borgen Project in Savannah, Georgia? The Borgen Project is currently hiring, and every little bit helps in the quest to end global poverty. The following positions can be done at home, and are a crucial part of The Borgen Project’s mission to fight poverty through lobbying powerful U.S. politicians to make a greater impact in their policy. Please review the descriptions below for more information on how to get involved in Savannah volunteer opportunities for The Borgen Project.

Regional Director
Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]rgenproject.org.
Learn more about the Regional Director Program

Writer
Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)
Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the United States.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in the community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

– Katie Pickle

Sources: The Borgen Project 1, The Borgen Project 2,
Photo: Come 2 Savannah

 

View Telecommute and Seattle Internships.

Baltimore_volunteer_opportunities
Do you live in Baltimore? Are you interested in combating global poverty? Great, because The Borgen Project is hiring in Baltimore, Maryland!

The Borgen Project is hiring national volunteers that can work remotely. Your role as a volunteer can help The Borgen Project educate the public or influence legislators about global poverty. For more information on Baltimore volunteer opportunities for The Borgen Project, please see the openings below.

Advocate
Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the United States.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Regional Director
Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]
Learn more about the Regional Director Program

Writer
Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

Youth Ambassador (High School Students only)
Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

– Ella Cady

Sources: The Borgen Project, The Borgen Project 2
Photo: Flickr

 

View Seattle Internships.

end_global_poverty
Creating a community of advocates is essential to ending global poverty.

According to USAID, approximately 1.2 billion people around the world currently live in poverty. However, from 1990 to 2010, global poverty has been cut in half and continues to decline today. The ultimate goal in this fight against global poverty is to eradicate it until it is no longer part of the world.

Although ending global poverty is not an easy feat, it is possible. Providing impoverished countries with the necessary tools to create a self-reliant community is an essential step. Tools such as education, healthcare and water are important influences on poverty.

Building clinics, water sources such as wells and schools for education can reduce the economic instability that exists in impoverished countries. Workshops on effective farming methods and fundamental knowledge can influence the day to day lives of the poor. By providing these tools, people can begin to translate what they have learned into their livelihood, which will in turn break the cycle of poverty and create a community with economic security.

Answering the question of how to end global poverty then becomes a matter of how to obtain and provide these necessary tools. The answer: creating a community of advocates.

When people are aware, committed and active regarding an issue such a global poverty, change occurs.

One of the ways the public can contribute is by raising awareness in the local community. The more people who are aware of the cause, the higher the chance of impact.

People can use their power of speech and right to vote to make the efforts to end global poverty known. Calling or emailing senators and local representatives in support of poverty-reducing bills can influence the amount of help given to fight global poverty.

Donating money and volunteering time to organizations that aid in the fight is another way to effect change. The Hunger Project and The World Food Programme are examples of organizations that use unique and effective methods to act against poverty. Coming up with new and creative platforms that engages the community is also another method.

It’s not about how large the act, but about the amount of people who act alongside the cause. It can be a phone call in support of a bill or an open mic night performance to raise awareness. It can be as simple as investing or donating money to the cause or volunteering time with an organization. It can be using power of speech to raise awareness or using the freedom to vote in support of a bill.

It can be a large or small contribution, but it’s a contribution nonetheless. The goal of ending global poverty becomes reality when the community as a whole comes together to fight. It can make an impact, and it can move the cause forward until poverty is completely eradicated.

In the words of JFK, “One person can make a difference and every person should try.”

Nada Sewidan

Sources: USAID,  The Borgen Project
Photo: Productive Flourishing

sydney ledonne

Name: Sydney LeDonne
Location: Waukesha, Wisconsin
Role: Political Affairs Intern​

How did you get interested in global issues?
I am currently enrolled in college at UW Waukesha​ for my bachelors in International Relations. I originally wanted to be a legislator but I didn’t think that I could be a politician with all the ambitions and desires that I have. I want to help people. In any way possible. And as I see now, there are a lot of things wrong with the world. And, with all the will I have, I want to try and fix them. Poverty is something that I am passionate about, too, because I grew up poor. Not by the standards that most people in underdeveloped countries live, but I still know what it’s like to feel uncertain about when your next meal will be or if you will have a bed to sleep in tonight. I want to help people so they never have to endure those terrible feelings. Even if it’s only a little, a little adds up.

What do you do when you’re not fighting global poverty?
Well, I am a sophomore, full time student at UW Waukesha. I work on the campus as an Orientation member which means that I help the incoming freshman become accustomed to the campus. I am also a UW Waukesha Cougar this year: I am a part of the cheer team. I love to read, listen to music and paint. My boyfriend, Jake, and I are in a long distance relationship so when I’m not talking to him, I’m usually working hard at school or reading books or painting. My favorite color is yellow and my favorite living creatures are bumblebees.

What have you learned/found interesting about The Borgen Project?
I really like how modern and calm the whole organization is. I like that it’s run by younger people and that we have the power, in a sense. I feel like I can relate and easily talk to the people I need to talk to in the organization without intimidation, that everyone is basically a kid, like me. I like that The Borgen Project has a straightforward message and it has straightforward ways to achieve what we need to. There isn’t any beating around the bush.

– Jack Todd

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shaina mackin

Name: Shaina Mackin
Location: Seattle, WA
Role: Political Recruiter Intern

Fundraising goal: $500

How did you get interested in global issues?
The word “justice” has always resonated with me. I have never been able to justify living a life that ignores the obvious responsibility we have as humans to improve the world. Acting as an advocate for those who do not yet have the power, the voice, or the resources to improve their own lives has always given me a sense of purpose. I recently graduated from Seattle Pacific University, where I studied Political Science and International Affairs. The courses I took delved deeply into issues of political and economic development. Coming from a multi-racial background, I have always tended to approach every issue I encounter from a global perspective, and as I continue to learn more about the world around me, my desire to work within the realm of advocacy and global justice is strengthened daily.

What do you do when you’re not fighting global poverty?
You can find me shooting hoops, hiking, reading, helping out in an ESL classroom, pretending I know more than six chords on my guitar, and drinking really good tea – all with the people I love.

What have you learned/found interesting about The Borgen Project?
What I love about The Borgen Project is its belief that domestic and foreign policy are not competing. I also love that while The Borgen Project wholly and completely supports direct aid, it chooses to take the macro-scale political approach, which – as a Political Science major – I find uniquely effective. Bottom-line: The Borgen Project makes fighting poverty tangible.

Any interesting tidbits to share?
I may or may not have recreated scenes from The Sound of Music while in Salzburg, Austria last summer after studying abroad in France. Similarly, there may or may not be video evidence. On another, more relevant note, having recently completed my undergraduate studies, I plan on spending a year overseas teaching English before returning to the States for graduate school in either a Global Thought or International Law program.

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Support Shaina’s Fundraising Campaign

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To Donate by Mail:
The Borgen Project
1416 NW 46th Street, Suite 105 PMB 145
Seattle, WA 98107

borgen project successes

 

In 2018…

  • 4.5 million people visited borgenproject.org.

  • 839 cities had Borgen Project volunteers.

  • 774 Meetings with Members of Congress and/or their staff.

  • 31,084 people applied to volunteer or intern at The Borgen Project.

 

Legislation that Passed in the 115th Congress (2017-18)

 

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Read Act

  • BUILD Act: The Better Utilization of Investments Leading to Development (BUILD) Act is the most ambitious reform to development financing in a generation. The bill created the first-ever U.S. International Development Financing Corporation (IDFC), which will help entrepreneurs secure financing and spark economic growth in developing countries. The BUILD Act was signed into law on October 3, 2018.
  • AGOA & MCA Modernization Act: The bill builds on the success of both the Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) and the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) programs. The bill gives the MCC the authority to develop a second concurrent compact with countries, which allows them to address deficiencies in their communications, transportation, and energy networks. The bill also increases the success of the AGOA program, which builds trade partnerships between sub-Saharan African countries and the U.S. by requiring the State Department to better promote the program with governments and businesses. The bill passed unanimously and was signed into law on April 23, 2018.
  • PEPFAR Extension Act: The President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) was launched in 2003 by President Bush to address the global AIDS crisis. Since the program launched, the U.S. has invested more than $70 billion in prevention, testing, and treatment programs reaching millions around the world. In 2018, the U.S. Congress recognized the success and importance of PEPFAR by extending it for an additional five years. The PEPFAR Extension Act passed unanimously and was signed into law on December 11, 2018.
  • Global Health Innovation Act: The bill requires the administrator of USAID to submit an annual report to Congress on the “development and use of global health innovations in the programs, projects and activities of the Agency,” thus ensuring that USAID continues to prioritize scaling up successes in its global health programs. The bill passed overwhelmingly and was signed into law on January 3, 2019.
  • Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment Act: Gender inequality is a key factor in women making up the majority of the world’s poor. The Women’s Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment Act makes it U.S. policy to reduce gender disparities related to economic participation and opportunity. This will “empower women with the tools to support their families and add value to their communities’ economy, ensuring their nations will be stronger, safer, and more peaceful,” said the bill’s original co-sponsor Rep. Ed Royce (R-CA). The bill passed overwhelmingly and was signed into law on January 9, 2019.
  • Protecting Girls’ Access to Education in Vulnerable Settings Act: The bill was signed into law on January 14, 2019. This critical legislation increases transparency, improves coordination and intensifies the impact of efforts to support access to primary and secondary education for displaced people, with a specific focus on the educational needs of women and girls.

Legislation that Passed in the 114th Congress (2015-16)

 

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Global Food Security Act

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Political Access for the Poor

The Borgen Project was created to give the world’s poor an influential ally and that objective has been achieved beyond anything we could have imagined. In 2018, The Borgen Project also met with the majority of congressional members on key committees that shape U.S. foreign policy.

In 2018, The Borgen Project met with:

  • 84% of U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee Members
  • 86% of U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Members
  • 94% of U.S. House Foreign Affairs Committee Members
  • 84% of U.S. House Appropriations Committee Members

The Scale of Impact at the Political Level

In January of 2007, The Borgen Project joined several U.S. leaders and organizations to help save $1 billion that Congress planned to cut from global health funding. The amount might seem minuscule compared to the $120 billion that was allocated to the Iraq War that year, but $1 billion in global health funding accomplished the following:

    • Provided treatment for 1.5 million people with malaria.
    • Provided 6.3 million people with bed nets to prevent malaria.
    • Provided 3.7 million people HIV tests.
    • Provided 110,000 people with AIDS treatment.
    • Provided 800,000 people with treatment for TB.

“Having made tremendous strides on behalf of impoverished families throughout the world, I applaud The Borgen Project for its tireless commitment to ending global poverty. Through strategic advocacy and public education, you are helping to shape U.S. policy for the betterment of mankind. We are proud to be home to visionary groups like The Borgen Project. You represent the best of who we are as a state and as a people – insightful thinkers, proactive leaders and inspiring problem-solvers, who are committed to redefining what is possible and, ultimately, to changing the world.”

– Gov. Jay Inslee (WA)

 

 

Education for All

On Sep. 8, 2017, the Reinforcing Education Accountability in Development (READ) Act was signed into law. The Borgen Project held 138 meetings on the Hill and mobilized more than 9,000 emails from constituents to their Members of Congress in support of the READ Act and the previous version of the legislation (the Education for All Act).

As a result, U.S. foreign policy will emphasize the value of education for economic growth and social mobility as it promotes educational programs around the world. Partnerships for educational development will have greater oversight and coordination and a renewed focus on retention. Education can reduce poverty, increase incomes and economic growth, foster peace, reduce fertility rates, child marriage and maternal death, promote gender equality and save lives. Here in the U.S., a world that is more educated means one that is safer from disease and extremism and one in which news doors of trade and collaboration will open.

It is projected that the READ Act will significantly improve the lives of more than 263 million school-aged young people. Girls and boys who learn to read, write and count — as well as pursue additional forms of education — will improve the world. The third section of the bill highlights the critical role of increased educational accessibility specifically for girls and women. 

Food Aid Reform

Generally, when wealthy nations provide emergency food aid in situations of war, famine and disaster, they purchase the food as close to the crisis as possible. This allows nations to quickly and cost-effectively assist as many people as possible. In the U.S., however, our laws require that the food come from the U.S. and 50% of it must be shipped on U.S. flagged cargo ships. This approach does not factor in the critical component of time; in fact it can take up to three months to reach people who are in dire need. The high cost of shipping food from the U.S. also means that a large percentage of food aid funding goes toward shipping costs. With 40% of U.S. food aid funding going to the shipping industry, our taxpayer dollars are wasted at the expense of millions of starving men, women and children. The Borgen Project is part of a coalition of nonprofit organizations advocating for critical reforms that will allow the U.S. to assist millions more without requiring additional funding.

  • Cargo Preference: In the spring of 2014, the U.S. House of Representatives passed a provision in the Coast Guard authorization bill, for which the maritime industry lobbied, that would increase the cargo preference from 50% to 75%. This costly provision would have resulted in two million fewer people, per year, receiving life-saving assistance from the U.S. The Borgen Project went to Capitol Hill to raise awareness on this harmful provision that was slipped into the approved House bill. During the Capitol Hill meetings, The Borgen Project brought attention to the issue and met with 26 Senate offices and 17 House offices. Among these offices, were the offices of the Chair and Ranking Member of the Coast Guard Subcommittee, which oversees this issue. The potentially devastating measure was defeated in the Senate.
  • 2014 Johanns-Leahy Amendment Food for Peace 202(e) – On May 8, 2014, the Senate Appropriations Committee adopted an amendment to include an additional $35 million cash flexibility in the Food for Peace Title II program. The Borgen Project was on Capitol Hill meeting with congressional offices the week of the vote. The amendment narrowly passed by two votes. Of those who voted yes, 9 out of 16 had met with The Borgen Project in the 48 hours leading up to the vote. The amendment was projected to help an additional 200,000 hungry and malnourished people. After the vote, Senator Patrick Leahy gave a nod of appreciation to The Borgen Project via Twitter. Unfortunately, the amendment wasn’t included in the final budget.

    Power for Africa

    On May 8, 2014 the Electrify Africa Act passed in the U.S. House of Representatives by a vote of 297-117. In sub-Saharan Africa, 589 million people – 68% of the population – do not have access to electricity. The purpose of the legislation is to provide first-time electricity to 50 million people by 2020.

    Of the Congressional Leaders who Cosponsored the Legislation…

    • 25 Cosponsored after meeting with The Borgen Project.
    • 13 Congressional leaders cosponsored after receiving emails from Borgen Project constituents in their district.

    Of the Congressional leaders Voting Yes for the Legislation…

    • 75 had met with The Borgen Project.
    • 78 had received emails from Borgen Project constituents in their district.

    In 2016, the legislation passed Congress and was signed into law by President Barack Obama.

     

    Access to Clean Water and Sanitation


    After six years of advocating for the Water for the World Act, in December of 2014 the legislation passed Congress and was signed into law by President Barack Obama. From 2009-2014, The Borgen Project built support for the Water for the World Act and held 410 meetings with congressional offices.

    The legislation builds on the success of the Water for the Poor Act of 2005, which has already provided millions of people with first-time access to clean drinking water and clean sanitation resources.In 2009, The Borgen Project began advocating for the United States to develop a coordinated strategy to improve conditions for those living without access to clean water and sanitation. In the 111th and 112th Congress, The Borgen Project met directly with hundreds of Congressional offices and mobilized thousands of Americans to contact their leaders in support of a clean water strategy. The focus of the advocacy campaign was the Water for the World Act, a bill that called for a White House water strategy and sought to provide 100 million impoverished people first time access to clean water. In June of 2012, the Water for the World Act (S. 624) passed in the Senate, before being held up in the House of Representatives Foreign Affairs Committee. The setback proved temporary, and in May of 2013, USAID Administrator Rajiv Shav and Water for the World Act sponsors Sen. Richard Durbin and Congressman Earl Blumenauer announced the first ever White House strategy for addressing the lack of access to clean water and sanitation. In August of 2013, a new version of the Water for the World Act was introduced and The Borgen Project is continuing to build support for it.

 

Political Accountability

For years, individual members of Congress have escaped public scrutiny while blocking legislation that if not for their actions, would have improved millions of lives. The Borgen Project is shining a spotlight on leaders who obstruct progress in downsizing poverty. For example, in 2010 The Borgen Project contributed to the passing of the Water for the World Act in the U.S. Senate. The bi-partisan legislation would have provided 100 million people with access to clean, drinkable water. However, in the House of Representatives, the ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee utilized her position to prevent the Water for the World Act from moving forward in the House. Her actions received zero media coverage and few voters in her district were aware of it until The Borgen Project published an Op Ed in The Huffington Post spotlighting her actions.

 

“The Borgen Project’s reputation for smart advocacy was confirmed to me when a senior Congressional staffer told me what an impression the organization had made on him. Clearly, The Borgen Project is an important emerging voice and a welcomed ally in the fight against global poverty.”

– Adam Olson, Oxfam America

U.N. Millennium Development Goals

The Borgen Project elevated the profile of global poverty and the U.N. Millennium Development Goals on Capitol Hill. In 2006, when The Borgen Project began meeting congressional leaders and staffers, few were aware that the U.S. and 190 other countries had committed to the Millennium Development Goals, a time frame for cutting global poverty in half. Through high-level meetings and targeted online buzz campaigns, The Borgen Project has drastically increased awareness of the Millennium Development Goals.

The Borgen Project first began Millennium Development Goals meetings with Barack Obama’s staff when he served in the U.S. Senate. Prior to announcing his run for President, The Borgen Project urged Obama to make addressing global poverty and achieving the Millennium Development Goals part of his campaign platform and foreign policy agenda. As both a candidate and as a President, Obama has incorporated the Millennium Developments Goals and cutting global poverty in half into his foreign policy strategy.

 

2009 White House Foreign Policy Statement:

Fight Global Poverty: Obama and Biden will embrace the Millennium Development Goal of cutting extreme poverty around the world in half by 2015, and they will double our foreign policy assistance to achieve that goal. This will help the world’s weakest states build healthy and educated communities, reduce poverty, develop markets, and generate wealth.”

“The Borgen Project has quickly become an influential ally for the world’s poor and given a voice to those born into extreme poverty. As a member of The Borgen Project’s Board of Directors, I’m honored to be part of this innovative organization. I congratulate the thousands of volunteers who’ve joined forces in building The Borgen Project into what it is today.”

– Congressman Adam Smith

Feeding the World

  • One in nine people are undernourished, which equates to 12.9% of the population of the developing world
  • Poor nutrition causes almost half of the deaths of children under five
  • 40% of the world is employed in agriculture
  • Access to more competitive resources, such as loans and electricity, will allow small farmers to achieve a more sustainable source of food

 

Global Food Security

The Problem:

  • Between 2007 and 2008, global food prices increased by 43%, pushing 100 million people into severe poverty. This came after years of world hunger reduction.
  • Approximately 1 billion people live on less than $1.00 per day. Over 162 million survive on less than $0.50 per day. Increasing food prices has the greatest effect on poor countries, where people spend 60 percent or more of their income on food.
  • In recent years, only 4% of foreign assistance from the world’s rich nations has been given to poor nations for agricultural development. Most of the food aid goes towards food donations, but this does not develop the host country’s capacity to produce its own food to feed its citizens. In the late 1970’s, it was nearly 18% when the West helped create the Green Revolution that assisted Asian farmers in improving the food supply. The resulting increase in food production raised the incomes for millions of poor farmers and decreased food prices. In China alone, hunger was cut in half between 1970 and 1990.

Impact: In 2009, The Borgen Project met with over 100 congressional offices while building support for Global Food Security initiatives on Capitol Hill. The Borgen Project also reached over 100,000 people through public awareness campaigns and helped mobilize thousands of people to contact their congressional leaders in support of legislation addressing global food security.

Outcome: In 2010, with momentum for Global Food Security on Capitol Hill, the Obama Administration established the Feed the Future program and allocated $3.5 billion in the budget proposal to help poor nations feed themselves. This program would provide the resources for 60 priority countries to develop the strategies to become self-sufficient and prevent future food crises. The Obama Administration also utilized the United States role as the world’s agenda-setter to mobilize G20 nations to pledge a total of $22 billion.

Projected impact of the $22 billion in Food Security funding:

  • Increased income for at least 40 million people on less than $2.00 per day.
  • Research on agricultural strategies to increase food production and famine prevention
  • 25 million children will receive nutrition interventions that prevent child mortality. These investments are projected to reduce the number of stunted children by 10 million and the number of underweight children by 4 million.
  • Millions of poor families will benefit from lowered food prices.

 

 

 

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Top 5 on the West Coast: In 2012, the Classy Award named The Borgen Project Top 5 on the West Coast for “Greatest Achievement by a Poverty and Hunger Relief Organization.”
Read more.

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Seattle Declares Borgen Project Day: In recognition of The Borgen Project’s impact in advocating for the world’s poor, Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn declared July 20th, 2013 “Borgen Project Day” in Seattle.

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GuideStar Exchange Seal for Commitment to Transparency: The Borgen Project has received the highest honor awarded by the nations leading agency for rating charities.

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KOMO News Brotherton Award: May 2012 recipient of the Brotherton Community Champion Award.

1. Doesn’t corruption in developing nations prevent aid from reaching the most impoverished people? While corruption exists nearly everywhere, including the United States, it is by no means a justification for ignoring the plight of the world’s poor. In recent years, experts have developed numerous strategies for bypassing corruption and ensuring that the world’s most vulnerable people receive assistance. The United States even set up a funding program (MCC) that requires countries to address corruption before they can receive assistance. This ensures that aid coming from the United States goes directly to the people.

 

2. Is the problem too big to address? While the problem is huge, the solutions are easy, affordable, and proven to work. In 2015 the UN completed its Millennium Development Goals, which in part sought to cut global hunger in half. This goal was achieved early, and the UN now targets zero hunger by 2030. It estimates that this lofty goal can be achieved with an additional $264 billion spent globally per year. This is less than the United States currently spends on interest payments on the national debt $283 billion and less than half of the U.S. defense budget $612 billion.  Click here to read facts about poverty-reduction successes occurring across the globe.

 

3. Why should the United States address poverty abroad when we have it here? These are not competing interests. Our foreign policy should be focused on international poverty because it’s the right thing to do and because it’s in our strategic interest. And for the same reasons our domestic policy should focus on poverty at home.

 

4. What is the biggest hurdle in achieving the UN Sustainable Development Goals and ending world hunger? Leadership from Congress and the White House. We’re the first country in history that has the ability and political power to end world hunger. As the world’s agenda-setter, the United States is in the unique position of leading the fight to reduce poverty and ensure that the Methods for Ending Poverty are achieved, with help from other nations and the private sector.

 

5. How is poverty fought on the ground? The strategies range from teaching farmers how to increase crop productivity to giving small loans to women so they can buy ovens and earn money selling bread.

 

6. Why do CEOs and the business community want the U.S. to end global poverty? The world’s poor are now viewed as the largest untapped market on earth. As people transition from barely surviving into being consumers of goods and products, U.S. companies gain new populations to which they can market their products. Many corporations have already benefited substantially from the poverty reduction that has occurred in India, China, and other parts of the world, and they realize that their future earnings are tied to whether or not U.S. leadership is working to reduce global poverty.

 

7. Why do defense experts view global poverty as a threat to the United States? Poverty creates desperate people and unstable conditions. As the National Security Strategy of the United States says, “A world where some live in comfort and plenty, while half of the human race lives on less than $2 a day, is neither just nor stable.”

 

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General Contact Info
[email protected]
206-471-4148

Media
[email protected]

Donors
[email protected]

Mailing Address:
The Borgen Project
1416 NW 46th Street, Suite 105 PMB 145
Seattle, WA 98107

Office Address:
The Borgen Project

4818 14th Ave NW, Suite 7
Seattle, WA 98107

 

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We’ve taken the battle to the highest level possible. The Borgen Project is an innovative, national campaign that works with U.S. leaders to improve their response to the global poverty crisis.

2 Ways Downsizing Global Poverty Helps the U.S.

donate_poverty
Creates Jobs

world_hunger
Improves National Security

Quick Ways to Help
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