Common Diseases in Bulgaria
Bulgaria, located in the Balkan region, borders the Black Sea between Romania and Turkey. The country’s life expectancy rate is increasing, with the urban population at 2.9 years’ increase and the rural population at 1.1 years’ increase. Although there is a continual increase, the life expectancy is only at 74.8 years as of July 2016, which is among the lowest life expectancies in the European Union. The common diseases in Bulgaria directly affect these statistics and daily life in the country

Communicable and non-communicable diseases affect Bulgaria at different rates. According to Healthgrove, the most common deadly non-communicable diseases include cardiovascular disease, cancer and chronic respiratory disease.

In 2013, the three most deadly cancers were tracheal, bronchus and lung cancer; colon and rectum cancer and stomach cancer. These comprised 44.1 percent of all deaths from cancer in Bulgaria at the time.

Common communicable diseases in Bulgaria include:

  • Lower respiratory infections
  • Meningitis
  • Encephalitis
  • Diarrheal diseases
  • Intestinal infectious diseases
  • Varicella and herpes zoster
  • Upper respiratory infections
  • Otitis media
  • Tetanus
  • Whooping cough
  • Diphtheria
  • Measles

These diseases are spread through contact with an infected person or breathing in particles from an infected person sneezing or coughing into the open air or on a non-infected person.

In 2015, the death rate per 100,000 people was 1,500 people. The following non-communicable common diseases in Bulgaria caused the most deaths:

  • Ischemic heart disease
  • Cerebrovascular disease
  • Hypertensive heart disease
  • Alzheimer disease
  • Lung cancer
  • COPD
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Other cardiovascular
  • Cardiomyopathy
  • Diabetes

Although it is difficult to prevent non-communicable diseases as they occur from the environment or are common within a family, communicable diseases can be prevented, meaning that many of the most common diseases in Bulgaria can be tackled. With vaccinations readily available for communicable diseases, good hygiene also plays a factor. Washing hands frequently, staying away from contaminated food and covering your mouth while coughing or sneezing can help lead to a disease-free, healthier lifestyle.

Stefanie Podosek

Photo: Flickr