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Top 10 Facts About Hunger in Argentina
Argentina is the eighth largest country in the world and the second largest country in South America with a current population of over 44 million people. While Argentina has seen some progress in reducing the rates of hunger and malnourishment, the country still struggles with food insecurity among many children and families.

What Are The Top 10 Facts About Hunger In Argentina?

  1. Over the years, Argentina has been decreasing its hunger rates and achieved a less than five Global Hunger Index or GHI score. However, in 2015, 3.6 percent of the population was undernourished and the figures do not look quite good even today.
  2. Food insecurity in Argentina has become a reason for concern because the country lacks effective food management strategies to prevent wastage. According to Mercedes Nimo, Undersecretary of Food and Beverages for the Ministry of Agriculture, Argentina wastes about a kilogram of food per person each day.
  3. According to the report published by the Food Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2018, 16 million loads of food are being wasted annually in Argentina. The Senate and ministries of Argentina are trying to devise strategies to reduce the wastage of food. Among the many efforts taken, September 29 has been declared as the ‘National Day for the Reduction of Food Losses and Waste in Argentina’. As of now, the law has issued a half-sanction approval on the date. The purpose of the day is to spread awareness about the tremendous loss of food, to promote effective strategies of food management and thereby lower the rates of hunger among the population.
  4. FAO also continues to strengthen food security in Argentina. Their priorities include evaluating the National Plan for Food Security and safeguarding the quality as well as the safety of food.
  5. Another organization fighting hunger in Argentina is The Huerta Nino foundation. It is a nonprofit organization located in Buenos Aires which works towards decreasing child malnutrition in the country. They do this by building organic gardens in rural schools. According to this foundation, over 43,000 children benefited from their work and currently they have about 500 active projects in Argentina.

  1. In 2015, the Huerta Nino project traveled to La Divina Pastora rural school in Mar Del Sur to initiate their project. The school has a population of 105 students of which 80 percent belong to poor families. According to the school Principal, Rita Darrechon, 10 percent of the students suffer from nutritional deficiencies from the moment they are born and in some cases even at the stage of prenatal growth. The Huerta Nino project aims to fight these nutritional deficiencies by teaching the students how to produce and grow their own food.
  2. Yet another organization that focuses on child nutrition in Argentina is Love Volunteers. It is a volunteer organization that has benefitted almost 3,500 unprivileged children.Volunteers at this organization provide children with technical and educational assistance while fulfilling their hunger and nutritional needs.
  3. According to Love Volunteers, their ‘Child Nutrition Volunteer Program’ provides nutritious food options to the underprivileged families, educate families and children on the importance of nutritious meal, and thereby improve the general health of the people. The project has the desire to provide food and promote healthy eating habits to children and families who are struggling.
  4. In 2015, the White Helmets Commission, the body of Argentina’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Worship that facilitates humanitarian assistance, joined the World Food Programme to fight against hunger in the country. These agencies developed an agreement that aims to improve the assistance provided in emergency situations by ensuring timely distribution of food in the areas affected by disasters.
  5. Last but not least, Barrios de Pie is another organization and movement that aims to decrease hunger in Argentina. According to Public Radio International, also known as PRI, in 2018, the soup kitchen created by them provided food for children in La Matanza, a province in Buenos Aires. Their aim, therefore, is to urge the congressional members to approve a food-emergency bill which would add $568 million in funds to support soup kitchens and food policy issues.
  1. These top 10 facts about hunger in Argentina represent the country’s consistent efforts in fighting and eliminating hunger. The many organizations operating in the country provide hope to find solutions and strategies to end the hunger epidemic in Argentina.
  2. – Charlene Frett
    Photo: Flickr

Causes of Poverty in Argentina
The poverty crisis in Argentina is extreme. The government estimates more than a full third of the population is living below the poverty line, and 20 percent live on less than two dollars per day. Poverty in Argentina means that eleven percent of people are estimated to be unable to meet basic food needs, and the poverty crisis hits minority groups the hardest.

Those that live in the mountainous regions of the northwest have poverty rates of over 50 percent, and those residing in the rainforest regions of the northeast are even higher, at over 60 percent. Women and children are disproportionately affected as well, with poverty rates roughly twice that of the national average.

The causes of poverty in Argentina are systemic and deeply rooted in the history of the country. The late 1980s and early 90s marked when the Argentine economic system collapsed due to inflation rates of nearly 20,000 percent. No system has seemed to work properly since then, with severe economic recessions occurring in 2002 and 2016.

Inflation and Poverty in Argentina

Currently, inflation rates hover around 40 percent, which is one of the most significant causes of poverty in Argentina. Industries nationwide have been hobbled, and Argentinian exports have gotten reduced. Additionally, due to high inflation, both foreign investors and domestic consumers have little confidence in the potential of their purchasing power.

Despite the multitude of causes of poverty in Argentina, the country is far from without hope. Mauricio Macri, who got elected in 2015 as President, has staunched the flow of inflation and economic recession. He has eliminated many unnecessary government subsidies and tariffs, increased export revenue and unified the national exchange rate. This political change has led to increased production from the agricultural, real estate and construction sectors, as well as slowed inflation.

The struggle is far from over.  With midterm elections approaching, Macri and his party recognize that the relatively minimal improvements may not be enough to allow his party to continue the good work they have begun. The deficit remains high, debt levels are rising and many of the worst affected people have yet to feel the end of the recession. There remains a great need for foreign investment and aid.  This support is necessary to both to alleviate regions perennially affected by economic strife and to assist the country as a whole in raising itself to self-sufficiency.

Connor Keowen

Photo: Flickr