Posts

refugees in greece
Marietta Provopoulou came home to find living conditions on her own soil worse than those of the African village in which she worked. After a decade of working with Medecins San Frontieres, or Doctors Without Borders, she took her work home to Greece to head MSF in Athens-mainly on the issue of migrant detention.

Upon discovering the conditions of migrant detention camps in Greece, Provopoulous commented that she didn’t even think such conditions were possible on the European continent. Further, other MSF members denounced the Greek government for its treatment of migrants, calling it a violation of national, European and international standards, and harmful to people’s health and dignity.

Greece is often utilized as an entry hub for migrants around the world- from Asia, Africa and the Middle East. Due to pressure from the European Union to halt the influx of immigrants, the ultra-conservative Greek government instituted its migration policy, Operation Xenious Zeus.

The policy was launched two years ago- a harsh policy that systematically detains refugees in Greece. According to MSF, undocumented migrants are routinely detained when apprehended on territory without valid documentation. Migrants, whose forced return does not occur within the initial detention period, are at risk for repeated detentions. The estimated number of migrants and asylum seekers in Greece’s detainment camps has exceeded 6,000.

Detention is frequently being used worldwide as a means to manage and restrict migrants and pressure them to return to their home soil. However, in most cases, particularly in Greece, the physical and mental health of detained migrants is largely neglected, if not abused.

In the MSF’s Invisible Suffering, a report on the condition of detention camps in Greece, it is noted that detainment has caused suffering directly linked to various health problems that require medical attention. Among these include scabies, dental problems, respiratory ailment, even tuberculosis. Mental illness is also a grim consequence; there have been several cases of suicide and incidents of detainees sewing their mouths shut as a form of protest.

Above all, the living conditions are inhumane and unsanitary. One such camp located on the Turkish border was described as having human excrement seeping through cracked pipes between the building’s floors. Detainees are crammed in dilapidated, perilous quarters. Suffering from overcrowding, filth and neglect, these migrants feel less than human. One young boy was recorded saying, “I have come for peace. I am not a criminal. I thought it was better for me to jump off the roof than to stay here.”

Despite recent international criticism, the Greek government is steadfast in its rigid policies. They have thus far shown no intention of loosening their tight reigns. It may take an international effort to bring humanitarian justice to Greek migrants.

– Samantha Scheetz

Sources: IPS, Medecins Sans Frontieres, The Guardian, NPR
Photo: Greek Independent News

ebola
An outbreak of Ebola has been linked to more than 330 deaths in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, according to the latest numbers from the World Health Organization.

The outbreak, which is ravaging West Africa, is “completely out of control,” says a senior official of Doctors without Borders, who also notes the organization is stretched to its limit in response to the epidemic. Bart Janssens, the director of operations for MSF in Brussels, reported that the epidemic is now in its second wave and, more than ever, the international organizations and governments providing aid need to send in more health experts, as well as increase the public educational messages regarding how to stop the spread of the disease.

The outbreak, which began in Guinea earlier this year, appeared to slow before ravaging in recent weeks, including spreading to the Liberian capital. With multiple locations of breakout and movements across several nations, the outbreak shows no signs of slowing. Janssens noted, “I’m absolutely convinced that this epidemic is far from over and will continue to kill a considerable amount of people, so this will definitely end up the biggest ever.”

This is the highest number of deaths associated with the Ebola virus, which is considered one of the most virulent in the world. At this point, Liberia has declared a national emergency.

With a real political commitment from the governments of the infected nations and a more effective response, the epidemic could perhaps be controlled. However, currently the Ebola outbreak is the worst it has ever been, “It’s the first time in an Ebola epidemic where [Doctors Without Borders] teams cannot cover all the needs, at least for treatment centers,” Janssens said.

The underdevelopment of these countries plays an important role in the spread of the virus. “The affected countries are at the bottom of the human development index,” Janssens noted. “Ebola is seriously crippling their capacities to respond effectively in containing the spread.”

— Elizabeth Malfaro

Sources: CBS News, USA Today
Photo: CNN

Doctors Without Borders and Measles in the Democratic Republic of Congo
There has been a threat from measles in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since 2010. Three months ago, the disease reached epidemic levels. Although much is being done to combat the spread of measles, tens of thousands of people are still affected.

Over the past year, Doctors Without Borders has inoculated nearly half a million children against measles, having to treat nearly 20,000 for the disease itself. Mortality rates can vary from 15 to 25 percent; the manager of a medical team “counted 35 dead in one village…traveling from village to village, we hear just one word: measles.”

Perhaps the most awful thing about measles outbreaks is that the disease itself is extremely treatable. Vaccines can be purchased for a pittance, but the problem in the Democratic Republic of Congo lies in getting the medicine to those who need it. Without modern infrastructure extending navigable roads to many villages, the vaccine cannot always be kept cold in transit. One health center “has only two refrigerators and one broken motorcycle to serve an area half the size of Switzerland.”

Doctors Without Borders put out the alert back in December, hoping that increased attention to the epidemic would bring more donations, and therefore more treatment. Tens of thousands of lives can be saved for barely a few dollars each. The only thing standing between those who are suffering and their good health is the vacillation of foreign donors.

Jake Simon

Source: Doctors Without Borders