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10 Facts about Life Expectancy in AndorraAndorra is a small principality nestled between Spain and France, with a population of 77,000 people. Famous for its ski resorts and status as a tax haven, Andorra also happens to have one of the highest life expectancies in the world. Here are 10 facts about life expectancy in Andorra.

10 Facts About Life Expectancy in Andorra

  1. Andorrans live to 83 years on average. According to the CIA, the country has the ninth highest life expectancy in the world. While the life expectancy of male Andorrans is 80.8 years, female Andorran life expectancy is 85.4 years.
  2. The culture of Andorra encourages exercise and physical activity. Andorra’s mountainous terrain has fostered a culture of physical fitness. Hiking, skiing and other recreational activities are commonplace in Andorra.
  3. Andorra has one of the best public health care systems in the world. Around 75 percent of outpatient medical care is reimbursed. About 90 percent of hospital expenses are reimbursed too.
  4. Infant mortality in Andorra is declining. According to UNICEF data, the current under-5 infant mortality rate in Andorra is 2.9 out of 1,000 live births. This is a significant improvement from the rate in 1990, where 10.8 infants out of 1,000 live births died.
  5. Ischemic Heart Disease (IHD) is the leading preventable cause of premature death in Andorra. IHD is caused by a buildup in the arteries, which restricts blood flow into the heart. In the long term, IHD can lead to a heart attack. According to a WHO report, while tobacco usage and high blood pressure rate are going down, obesity is on the rise in Andorra as more people are consuming fast foods. Still, the majority of the population maintains a Mediterranean diet with the following staples: lean meat, vegetables and olive oil.
  6. The entire population of Andorra has access to an improved water source. However, the overall surface water quality does give rise to some concerns. In 2017, the Andorran Ministry of Environment reported that 86 percent of surface water in Andorra was of high quality, while 8 percent was of acceptable quality, 3 percent of poor quality and 3 percent of very poor quality.
  7. Every citizen in Andorra has access to improved sanitation facilities. Since 1996, Andorra installed four wastewater purification plants. The wastewater purification plants purify almost 100 percent of sewage in Andorra.
  8. The immunization rate in Andorra is very high. According to the WHO, Andorra has a general vaccination rate of 99 percent. Early childhood diseases such as measles, HepB3 and rubella are some of the most common diseases that Andorran kids get vaccinated for.
  9. The physician density of Andorra is 3.33 physicians per 1,000 people. This causes some concerns since this is a drop from 2010, which had 4 physicians per 1,000 people. In addition, the current physician density in Andorra is below the E.U. average, which is around 3.5 physicians per 1,000 people.
  10. Crime is nearly “nonexistent” in Andorra. There is one prison with a few dozen inmates, bringing peace of mind to citizens of the small state. Andorran diplomat, Juli Minoves, said it best in 2008: “I think that gives a lot of peace of mind to people. I think there is a psychological factor here, a feeling of safeness that people start to absorb from the moment they are born. Plus, there is a long tradition of democracy, of solving conflict in an amicable way.”

Lifestyle factors, a safe environment and access to excellent health care are the main contributors to an exceptionally high life expectancy rate in Andorra. A close-knit sense of community among Andorrans also contributes to a happy and healthy way of life in the European country.

YongJin Yi
Photo: Flickr

Education in Andorra

Positioned between the Spanish territory and France, Andorra occupies a small territory of 180 square miles. Considered to be one of the smallest countries in the world, its current population is approximately 77,000 people.

Regardless of its size, Andorra positions as the 191st largest export economy around the globe, making the European country a privileged one, in terms of its relationship with countries around the world as well as the European Union. Thus, Andorra uses the Euro as its national currency and carries a special relationship with the U.N.

In 1982, the Andorran education system was implemented. This system helped built a strong school system that is now recognized as one of the best in the world, due to its language variety and free schooling up until high school.

As a country that borders France and Spain, its citizens speak mainly Catalan – a dialect of Spanish – as well as Spanish and French. Thus, education in Andorra is divided into those three languages. French-speaking, Spanish and Catalan schools are the three schooling options for students to choose from. It is well known that 50 percent of students study in French-focused schools, whilst the other half is divided between the Catalan and Spanish schools.

Added to the fact that education has three different options in regards to language, education in Andorra is also divided between public, private and state-funded private schools – which can be described as a middle option that lies between public and private education. This schooling system is similar to the one in Spain, due to the proximity of the countries and the overall similarities between them. With the same schooling system as Spain, Andorra‘s public school system is completely funded by the state, yet the teachers are paid by Spain and France.

A downside to the education in Andorra is the fact that there is only one university in the whole country, the University of Andorra. Thus, most students attend college in either France or Spain after they graduate high school, mostly depending on the language and school they previously chose to attend.

Overall, the school system and education in Andorra is one of the most surprising in the world. Such a small country is able to divide its school system into up to three languages as well as three different economy-based schools and high schools, giving opportunities to all citizens to be able to study and afford a quality education whilst doing so.

Paula Gibson

Photo: Pixabay

Poverty Rate in Andorra
Andorra is a small nation in Europe, landlocked between the French and Spanish borders. For the majority of the country’s history, both French and Spanish leaders ran the government. This form of rule continued until 1993, when the feudal system that ran the nation was modified, leaving the co-princes of the nation to work alongside a parliamentary democracy to execute the rule of the country.

The Poverty Rate in Andorra

Before World War II, the majority of the citizens in Andorra lived in the same way they did in the Middle Ages. They primarily survived on small-scale farming and smuggling. In the modern day, this trend persists, and many citizens continue to live in old farmhouses from this era in history.

The subsequent increase in European tourism in the 1950s aided the country in developing its more rural regions. As tourism increased, old farm houses and undeveloped land became family hotels and restaurants, allowing for people in a lower income bracket to participate in the economy. When measured in 1996, Andorra had a GDP per capita of $18,000, which was higher than its neighbor, Spain.

The service-based economy has proven to be effective at maintaining a low poverty rate in Andorra. When measured in 1998, the country had a 1.62 percent rate of inflation. This low inflation rate and participation in the country’s economy have allowed even the poorest people to have a high standard of living. No extreme cases of poverty have been recorded in the country in recent history.

The Takeaway

Andorra is a country that made the most of the increased tourism in Europe after World War II. By allowing its citizens to convert their small farms into business, the poverty rate in Andorra has managed to remain low. Other European nations that have small economies should emulate the model that Andorra practices due to its effectiveness in maintaining a low poverty rate.

Nick Beauchamp

Photo: Flickr

Human Rights in Andorra

Andorra is a country with a population of around 85,000 and currently has a constitutional parliamentary democracy as its form of government. In recent years, the migrant population in Andorra has dramatically increased. This increase has caused many in the nation to consider the current state of human rights in the country, as in the past they were not ideal for women and religious minorities.

Arrest Procedures
In many countries that suffer from continual human rights violations, one symptom of this suffering takes the form of its citizens being unlawfully arrested. Andorra has laws that require police to have a warrant for an arrest. Also, Andorra police must release detainees after 48 hours if they are not charged with a crime.

Women’s Rights
One way to evaluate human rights in a country is to examine the treatment of women. Andorra was the tenth country to ratify the Istanbul Convention, which targets violence against women and created a plan to fight against domestic abuse. The treaty defines the various methods of violence used against women and prohibits them by law. Thus, human rights in Andorra are on the rise because of its support for women’s rights described in the Istanbul Convention.

Freedom of Speech and Press
The constitution of Andorra states that the country’s citizens have the right to freedom of speech and the press. The restriction of these human rights in Andorra is punishable by law. The Andorran government recognizes how important the collaboration of the press and the government is to ensure the human rights of its citizens.

The Takeaway
The primary markers of human rights are how people are treated in court, how women are treated in society and if the citizens of a country are allowed to practice freedom of speech. The people of Andorra are fortunate to live in a country that guarantees these fundamental rights in their constitution. The continued effort to enforce these laws ensuring human rights in Andorra proves that it is a leader in human rights and an example to other nations.

Nicholas Beauchamp

Photo: Flickr

AndorraSituated in the mountains between Spain and France, it’s easy to forget about Andorra, one of the smallest states in Europe. Because of its duty-free shopping, winter sports and hot summers, it is a popular destination for the eight million tourists that visit annually. Travelers enter the country from either France or Spain, since it has no airport. The following facts and figures in Andorra paint a picture of prosperity and ongoing challenges.

  1. Andorra doesn’t get much press. This may be due to the small population (less than 100,000), and the actual area of the country is only about two-and-a-half times the size of Washington, D.C.
  2. Most of the country’s GDP comes from tourism and investments. The majority of employed individuals work in a service-industry position. The population enjoys a high standard of living. In 2016, unemployment was 3.7 percent. Poverty statistics are currently unavailable.
  3. Andorra has six major political parties. Additionally, there are several smaller parties at the parish level.
  4. Despite being so small, It also has a higher per-capita income than both Spain and France. It was a tax haven until France and Spain opened its borders. Andorra has no external debt.
  5. Andorra imports all of its food. Only 5.5 percent of its land is arable.
  6. Andorra is not without problems. One concern is affordable housing. While most of the housing in the country is new, it is also scarce. A look at lucasfox.com shows properties selling from 200,000 Euros ($228,000 USD) to well over a million Euros ($1,141,000 USD). Amendments to residency requirements have recently been made in order to open the market. It used to be a person buying property in Andorra had to have lived there for at least 20 years. Locals continue to live with their families in farmhouses.
  7. Environmental concerns included solid waste disposal, deforestation and overgrazing.
  8. In terms of health, nearly a third of the population is obese. According to 2014 statistics, 8.1 percent of its GDP (an estimated $3.327 billion as of 2015) was spent on health. Life expectancy is 82.8 years.
  9. Andorra is looking to attract foreign investing. Before 2008, non-residents could own 33 percent of a company. After living in the country 20 years, they could then own 100 percent of a company. This was due to concerns about foreign ownership on the economy.

As these facts and figures in Andorra show, it is a peaceful, small country as a retirement haven, or for those looking for an out-of-the-way skiing vacation.

Gloria Diaz

Photo: Pixabay

Andorra Refugees
Home to roughly 79,300 people, Andorra is a tiny principality located in the mountainous region between France and Spain. Although the principality joined the Council of Europe and the United Nations, it is not an official member of the European Union. Despite this, Andorra maintains a special relationship with the European Union, and, today, supports the common policy for refugees that the European Union has established. Here are 10 facts about Andorra refugees:

  1. The principality works directly with the European Union in matters of solidarity.
  2. Andorran Foreign Minister Gilbert Saboya has stated that the principality works with representatives from the European Union to create a screening and security process which will accommodate only 40 refugees.
  3. Andorra agreed to assist refugees for strictly humanitarian reasons. However, the municipality stated that it guarantees no official protections.
  4. A political asylum plan is not a priority of the local government, and is by no mean, an “action plan.” Instead, Andorra plans to support the common policy of the European Union.
  5. Currently, an individual must reside in Andorra for 15 years before they may apply for citizenship.
  6. Current opposition parties are working on legislation which would allow an individual to apply for citizenship before a period of 15 years.
  7. In order for anyone to obtain Andorran citizenship, an exam must be taken in the national language of Catalan. Geography and history questions are included on the exam.
  8. According to the most recent World Data information, the Andorran government received zero asylum applications.
  9. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees recommended that Andorra “accede to the 1951 Convention relating to the status of refugees and its 1976 Protocol,” and “establish a refugee status determination procedure which is fully gender and age sensitive.”
  10. The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees also recommends that Andorra “accede to the 1954 Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons and the 1961 Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness.”

Although Andorra is quite small, the reality for Andorra refugees reveals that the principality is representative of a number of countries who have yet to commit to providing asylum. Should the Andorran government continue to work directly with the European Union on this matter, refugee asylum may be in the foreseeable future.

Shannon Golden

Photo: Pixabay


Andorra is a healthy country; its lack of heavy industry leaves air clean, and people of all ages are used to climbing up and down its hillsides, both of which contribute to the country’s very high life expectancy Still, there is disease. The major diseases in Andorra are non-communicable in nature.

Some of the major diseases in Andorra are cardiovascular diseases, cancer and neurological disorders. These are the most deadly non-communicable diseases. According to HealthGrove, 40.1 percent are affected by cardiovascular diseases, 31.6 percent are affected by cancer and 11.9 percent are affected by neurological disorders like Alzheimer’s disease.

Cardiovascular Diseases
In 2013, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and other cardiovascular and circulatory diseases were the most deadly cardiovascular diseases. They accounted for 87.6 percent of all deaths from cardiovascular disease in Andorra. Of the three, ischemic heart disease was the most deadly, followed by stroke. The mortality rate for the former has decreased by 11 percent since 1990; for the latter it has declined eight percent. The other cardiovascular and circulatory diseases, on the other hand, kill fewer people, but their mortality rate has increased by 25 percent in little more than a generation.

Cancer
Tracheal, bronchus and lung cancer were the three most deadly cancers in 2013, followed by colorectal and prostate cancer. The rate of cancer deaths is on the rise in Andorra. The mortality rate for the respiratory-related cancers is up 18 percent since 1990; for colorectal cancer the increase is 19 percent. The mortality rate for prostate cancer has grown by an astonishing 48 percent since 1990.

Neurological Disorders
Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias, Parkinson’s disease, and other neurological disorders were the most deadly neurological disorders in Andorra in 2013. In 2013, 72.8 people out of every 100,000 were killed by Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Since 1990, the mortality rate for these dementias has increased by 29 percent. Parkinson disease killed another 8.1 per 100,000; its mortality rate has climbed by 61 percent. The mortality rate for other neurological disorders is up 17 percent since 1990.

Even though non-communicable diseases are some of the major diseases in Andorra, the country, overall, is still relatively healthy. Andorra has some of the most technologically advanced hospitals in Europe. There are ten state-funded health centers in Andorra, which are staffed by nurses. They are responsible for first aid, antenatal and child care, nursing services, home and rehabilitation care, immunizations and general healthcare. Moreover, emergency care is free for everyone.

Solansh Moya

Photo: Flickr

Poverty in Andorra
Andorra is a mountainous region located between France and Spain, officially a principality with two co-princes and its own constitution. Known for having lavish skiing attractions, Andorra had a 2014 GDP of $3.28 billion. With a population of just 85,000, this gives Andorra the ninth-highest GDP per capita in the world, at about $53,000. No data exists on poverty in Andorra, but it is generally assumed to be nonexistent.

Andorrans enjoy a high standard of living and have the highest life expectancy in the world, at 83.5 years. Most exports consist of technology equipment such as integrated circuits and orthopedic appliances, along with another stream of revenue, briquette sales. GDP has risen steadily since 2013, partially due to austerity measures.

Dominated by an urban population, only five percent of the region’s land is arable. That is why most food has to be imported from other countries. Prior to tourism, agriculture was the leading stream of revenue as tobacco was sold.

Major sources of income now include tourism and retail sales on products like perfume because of the country’s duty-free status. These are the primary sources of wealth and account for three-quarters of GDP.

The government of Andorra did a good job stabilizing its economy after the steady decline in tourism that occurred after 2010. Relaxation of the residency and investment laws contributed to the country’s attractiveness to foreign visitors, however now its relatively small housing market is among the many around the world affected by speculation.

With lavish hotels and a change in laws, stabilization of tourism was able to occur. Even with a negative trade balance, poverty in Andorra is minimal and the country is projected to continue to rise in GDP into 2017. Taking the appropriate steps helped the Andorran economy recover.

Nick Katsos

Photo: Flickr