Every Last One CampaignWorld Vision is a humanitarian organization established in 1950 to help vulnerable people “reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice.” Since its start, World Vision has assisted in several crises throughout the world such as the Ethiopian famine in the 1980s and the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Africa in the 1990s. In 2015, World Vision launched a campaign known as Every Last One. The campaign spans eight years and amounts to $1 billion. Overall, its goal is to provide relief, assistance and opportunities to approximately 60 million vulnerable people worldwide by 2023. The aid seeks to empower people “to lift themselves out of poverty.”

Campaign Context and Details

World Vision notes that around 689 million people all over the world live in extreme poverty. This specifically translates into subsisting on less than $1.90 a day. The COVID-19 epidemic has introduced additional challenges to vulnerable people across the globe. According to the World Bank, the COVID-19 pandemic could potentially thrust 150 million people into extreme poverty by the close of 2021. In fact, the COVID-19 pandemic threatens to reverse decades of poverty reduction progress globally as well as strides made in education and health.

For this reason, the humanitarian organization has framed its Every Last One campaign in terms of “life, hope and a future.” The life aspect involves providing people with “access to clean water and essential healthcare” services. Hope refers to training and equipping teachers, parents and pastors with the skills and resources needed to “protect children from violence” and supply emergency relief aid to people facing natural disasters and other humanitarian crises.

Finally, the concept of a future focuses on economically empowering people to create “improved and resilient livelihoods” through education initiatives, books and training as well as recovery loans for those affected by the pandemic. In all its work, World Vision strives for gender equality, acknowledging that empowering girls and women is essential for reducing global poverty. To date, the call for donations and investments continues.

Financial Transparency and Accountability

World Vision has provided evidence that the Every Last One campaign is economically viable. On its website, the humanitarian organization has posted its financial reports and financial highlights of 2020 as a gesture of accountability. These highlights indicate that the organization has dedicated 88% of its operating expenses toward initiatives that help “children, families and communities in need,” with the remaining 12% set aside for management and fundraising efforts.

Moreover, the organization’s financial reports indicate that it received a grand total of $1,233 million in revenue in 2020, the majority of which came in through “private cash contributions.” It has also worked on decreasing overhead expenses by 3% from 2019 through improved stewardship practices. These figures indicate that World Vision has a sustainable system in place to make the most impact and ensure that disadvantaged people receive the most benefit.

Contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals

World’s Vision’s Every Last One campaign may prove instrumental in assisting the United Nations’ 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The U.N.’s target to end global poverty by 2030 is the first among the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) indicated in the United Nations’ Agenda. The Agenda itself recognizes that meeting such a goal within the given time frame would require massive global mobilization and collaboration among various groups and organizations. Therefore, World Vision’s own initiative may play a significant role in realizing the U.N. SDGs.

– Jared Faircloth
Photo: Flickr

Africa's Digital Economy ContributesDigitalization is not new to the African economy. However, with the COVID-19 pandemic, the need to improve and expand Africa’s digital economy has become evident. With intentions to minimize the health and economic risks of the pandemic, African businesses are implementing strategies that will lead to the rise in digital transformation. Economic sectors such as banking, transportation, agriculture and telecommunication have already digitally evolved to adjust to the economic climate and health crisis. Most importantly, Africa’s digital economy contributes to the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Developing Africa’s Digital Economy

The World Bank started the Digital Economy Initiative for Africa (DE4A) in mid-2019 to accelerate digital enabling achievements as part of the 2030 SDGs. As the COVID-19 pandemic transpired, the rise in digitalization laid expectations for more transformations in the coming years. With investments being made, Africa’s booming digital economy contributes greatly to the SDGs.

A digital economy would create more jobs, promote entrepreneurship and introduce new markets. Reaching DE4A’s targets would raise growth per capita by 1.5 percentage points annually and poverty would be reduced by 0.7 percentage points per year. In addition, this approach takes into account that only 27% of the African population has access to the internet. Increasing access to digital resources will be the focus of the five pillars of the DE4A. This includes digital infrastructure, digital public platforms, digital financial services, digital businesses and skills.

Growing the Economy by Promoting Digital Transformation

The African Union (AU) has launched the Digital Transformation Strategy for Africa (2020-2030). The initiative strives for a collaborative digital single market, building on the recent trade initiative, Africa’s Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA). This would facilitate the movement of digitized services and propel the expansion of internet access across the continent.

Notably, the initiative also promotes innovation and digital upskilling with development programs. The e-skills vocational program will reach 100 million Africans a year by 2021 and 300 million annually by 2025. This would not only integrate Africa into the digital era but create new opportunities for startup businesses.

An important tool to achieve the initiative’s objectives is collaboration with policymakers. The government plays an important role in the promotion of market transformation. As a result, the AU will propose actions to equip educational institutions with renovated technology, promote digital rights and security awareness.

Significant growth will occur when stable infrastructure is built for the 200 million people currently without internet access. Addressing this digital divide is how Africa’s digital economy contributes to the SDGs as it plans to build resilient infrastructure, create sustainable industrialization and foster innovation.

Investing in Digital Resources

There are many investment opportunities in Africa’s digital economy as a myriad of sectors start transitions. For example, banking in Africa is experiencing major changes. Mobile-based digital banks provide access to transaction activity, savings, loans and other financial services. Banking in Africa is expected to increase to $53 billion by 2022 so long as digitalization continues, contributing to the DE4A’s digital financial service objective.

Additionally, large international corporations have set foot in Africa, which will further increase investment flow. In 2019, Amazon Web Service launched its first data center in Africa. Likewise, Microsoft expanded its cloud services and opened its first data centers in South Africa. With two of the biggest players in the global digital economy in Africa, increased access to methods for digital transformation for businesses becomes more feasible. Digital transformation in Africa has the potential to significantly reduce poverty on the continent.

Malala Raharisoa Lin
Photo:Flickr