Electricity Coverage Rising in AfricaIt is hard to imagine life without electricity. In the American standard of living, electricity pervades every aspect of a person’s life, from food storage to entertainment and everything in between. In Africa, however, only 30 percent of people have access to electricity.

Power Africa

Power Africa is a USAID agency that aims to provide people in Africa with access to electricity. They plan to make 60 new electricity connections and generate 30,000 more megawatts (MW) of electricity across the continent by 2030. The goal is to do this by harnessing the sun, wind, lake water, and natural gas to power rural areas that do not have access to electricity.

Power Africa tracks its progress on various projects by tracking business transactions with African power companies. For example, in 2016, they made a deal with the U.S.-Africa Clean Energy Finance Initiative (ACEF), the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC), and the U.S. Department of State to provide $30 million worth of financing of 32 renewable energy projects in 10 countries in Africa. With Power Africa’s help, 90 business transactions have been completed and 25 of Africa’s 55 countries now have access to some form of electricity. Examples from Power Africa actions are described in a text below.

Mali

Although the demand for electricity in Mali is currently greater than the supply, that does not mean that there is no supply at all. Electricity in Mali currently comes from mostly hydraulic and thermal energy (55 and 44 percent, respectively). Power Africa plans to help Mali produce an additional 80 MW of hydroelectric energy, more than 300 MW from biomass, and unlimited MW from the sun.

Electricity usage has already gone up in Mali. Major mining companies increased their energy consumption by 136 MW (189 percent) between 2008 and 2011. In 2016, the government passed a law mandating partnerships between public and private electric companies in order to increase MW production. The ultimate goal is to make an additional 20,000 MW of energy and distribute it to 50 million people by 2020.

Namibia

Currently, Namibia gets most of its electricity from power grids in South Africa, Zimbabwe, and other nearby countries. However, electricity demand in these countries is way higher than supply, forcing Namibia to find ways to generate its own electricity. As of 2008, Namibia can only generate 393 MW from 3 stations, while the national demand is 533 MW.

One of these stations, the Ruacana power station, is dependent on the flow of water from the Kunene River, which flows out of Angola. Another station, the coal-run Eck power station, is costly to operate and maintain. Eck, along with the oil-based Paratus power station, is only used for short-term peaks in electricity demand.

For the time being, Namibia still needs to have its electricity needs met by its neighbors. The Caprivi link is a transmission line that connects Namibia’s power grid to those in Zambia and Zimbabwe. This provides the country with an additional 600 MW, fulfilling Namibia’s electricity needs. In 2007, Namibia consumed 3.6 TWh of electricity.

Tanzania

Most of Tanzania’s electricity (90 percent) comes from biomass. This has resulted in mass deforestation and, thus, is far from ideal for the ecosystem. Only 18.4 percent of Tanzanian citizens have access to electricity in any form. Currently, the country is financially incapable of extending the power grid into all rural areas.

In 1975, the government founded the Tanzania Electric Supply Company Ltd (TANESCO). TANESCO has a nationwide monopoly on electricity production and distribution. However, the Ministry of Energy and Minerals (MEM) is trying to end this monopoly by allowing companies to get licenses to generate, transmit and distribute electricity. The Rural Energy Agency (REA) is slowly getting electricity into rural areas. With these services, the government aims to make electricity available to everyone in Tanzania, and one can see electricity coverage rising from their efforts.

Conclusion

In the modern day, electricity seems like a basic ingredient for life that it seems like everyone should have it. The people in Power Africa agree and we can see electricity coverage rising in Africa as a result of their efforts. Mali is making more energy from more sources than ever, Namibia is starting to make its own electricity, and Tanzania is spreading electricity out as far as it can. Africa is becoming more and more electrified, reaching the ultimate goal- provide access to electricity for everyone on the continent.

– Cassie Parvaz
Photo: Flickr

U.S. Benefits from Foreign Aid to Namibia
Namibia is a sparsely populated country on the southwestern coast of Africa whose priceless natural resources and small population of 2.5 million enable its upper-middle income status. Relations between the United States and Namibia are friendly, and the U.S. has supported the country’s recovery after the damage of apartheid through programs that improve healthcare, education and economic opportunities.

About two-thirds of Namibian citizens live in rural areas, and two-thirds of the people in rural areas rely on subsistence farming for a living. The country has seen a reduction in poverty, yet this has not had an effect on the rather high unemployment rate of 28.1 percent and the socioeconomic inequalities that linger from the apartheid era. Outside of satisfying a moral need, the U.S. benefits from foreign aid to Namibia in its efforts to address these issues.

A History of U.S. Involvement

USAID involvement in Namibia started in 1990 with the country’s independence from South Africa. South Africa seized the territory from Germany, which was then called South-West Africa, during World War I and annexed it after World War II. The South-West Africa People’s Organization guerrilla group spurred a war for independence in 1966, but South Africa did not release the territory until 1988 under the United Nations peace plan. 

In 2014, the Millennium Challenge Account Compact that aimed to reduce poverty and stimulate growth in education, tourism and agriculture proved to be a success. Namibia is also one of the countries participating in the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), which was initiated by USAID and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Considering the global epidemic of HIV/AIDS and the changing needs within Namibia, USAID has since shifted its main attention to HIV/AIDS work, making large investments in Namibia’s health services. 

How the U.S. Benefits from Foreign Aid to Namibia: Economic Growth and Trade 

Namibia has many strengths that make it a viable country for economic growth. It is politically stable and has developed infrastructure and a modern telecommunication system.

As Bill Gates has noted in several op-eds supporting foreign aid, foreign U.S. investments are beneficial to American businesses by providing opportunities for new customers and new suppliers. When private companies collaborate with organizations like USAID, it creates a market for American goods. One example of a way in which the U.S. benefits from foreign aid to Namibia is if an American company were to help to raise the productivity of subsistence farmers in Namibia, this would benefit farmers and workers in the U.S. while opening the possibility for a larger market in that part of the world.

In regard to fighting HIV/AIDS and disease globally, Gates says societies are more productive when there are healthy “teachers, police officers and entrepreneurs.” Countries such as Namibia that worked with PEPFAR have “improved three times more on one measure of economic development than their non-PEPFAR counterparts,” Gates confirmed. Gates observes that foreign aid alone is not an immediate solution to global poverty, but it stimulates sustainable growth that improves global well-being. Continued support of Namibia and other countries can bring wide-ranging benefits to the U.S. and the world.

– Camille Wilson
Photo: Flickr

sustainable agriculture in NamibiaAgriculture is an important part of a country’s economy. If a country does not have sustainable agriculture, it puts the economy in danger of failing and puts the nation’s citizens at an economic disadvantage. This has been the case for the country of Namibia.

Throughout the past few years, Namibia has suffered through three significant droughts that have had a severe negative effect on its agriculture. The lack of rain has led to soil erosion across the country as well as crop failure and high livestock mortality rates. Considering the country of Namibia relies heavily on farming its own food instead of having products imported, this has caused a numerous amount of problems throughout the country. In the aftermath of the drought’s impact, sustainable agriculture in Namibia has been placed in question.

The lack of food security caused by the impact of the drought has put the country in a very troubling place in regards to both its agriculture and economy. The lack of sustainability has also led to a significant decrease in income for farmers who live off their land and make money from their crops. This has left many citizens, as well as the country as a whole, at an economic disadvantage.

The disastrous effects of the drought have led to the Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) stepping in to make a presentation about the country. The presentation highlights ways that sustainable agriculture in Namibia can be reached, and provides a platform for people to create ideas to help the country get back on its feet. The country has been in an unstable state because of the nature of its land as a result of the droughts, and the FAO is trying to come up with ideas to rectify the situation for Namibian citizens.

Despite the negative situation, the country has been able to sustain itself through the help of the First National Bank of Namibia. The Bank has contributed thousands of dollars to the farmers of Namibia to help support them through the effects of the drought and has continued to show support to the citizens of the country as they recover from the trying years. The need for sustainable agriculture in Namibia is still high, but farmers are doing their best to meet these needs and help create economic equilibrium in the country.

The cattle farmers in Namibia are experiencing a surprisingly good year compared to the past few they have had, and have been able to increase sales despite having to reduce their herds during the drought. This is a good sign for Namibia because it is now able to bring money into the country to help stabilize the economy, which can lead to a more sustainable agriculture.

Namibia is looking forward to a very rainy and prosperous year for its crops. This will hopefully allow the nation to create and maintain sustainable agriculture and an improved economy as a result.

– Simone Williams

Photo: AllAfrica

The Success of Humanitarian Aid to Namibia
The Republic of Namibia, a small Southwest African country, suffers heavily from natural disasters. These are disasters such as flash floods, droughts, epidemics and tropical cyclones. Furthermore, Namibia is crippled with a high percentage of HIV and TB. However, in recent years, the humanitarian aid to Namibia is finally making a noticeable impact. Programs such as Project HOPE, the USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster and UNICEF have all provided a helping hand.

Project HOPE Humanitarian Aid in Namibia

Project HOPE’s humanitarian aid to Namibia started in 2002. Initially, its primary focus was on inputting healthcare services and providing health education. Since then, the organization has grown to spread awareness of HIV and tuberculosis (TB).

In 2013, HOPE launched a 5-year program called the Namibia Adherence and Retention project (NARP). The program’s goal was to establish stronger cohesion and retention to HIV care treatment, which includes preventing transmission between mother and child. Another goal is to improve the impact of HIV of those living with the condition.

By 2016, HIV was the leading cause of premature death in adults and the sixth leading cause for children. To combat the disease, Project HOPE created a Collaboration Program which strived to introduce TB/HIV collaborative activities into current community-based programs. Simultaneously, the program aimed to advance TB diagnostics.

The USAID Office of Foreign Disaster

The USAID Office of Foreign Disaster assists Namibia mostly with natural disasters. Namibia’s environmental stressors negatively affect food security in vulnerable homes, livestock and crop growth.

In 2017, the USAID Office of Foreign Disaster provided a substantial donation to northern regions of Africa. It offered $8.6 million to multi-sectors as well as $1 million to improve sanitary conditions, water needs and hygiene. Another $1.9 million was provided to protect food security.

USAID also provided about $27,000 to UNICEF to improve nutritional needs.

Other relief actors have focused on bettering agricultural and harvesting needs. As of a result of these various donations, regions like Namibia have seen an improvement in food security in vulnerable households.

UNICEF’s Contribution to Humanitarian Aid in Namibia

The United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) made a considerable difference with the children of Namibia. As a result of droughts, poor sanitation and flooding, many children have severe acute malnutrition (SAM).

As a result, UNICEF supporters were able to help more than 4,000 children suffering from SAC and provide proper treatment. UNICEF was also able to train close to 150 health workers to adequately treat infants and young children with SAM.

Furthermore, malaria continues to spread in the northern reigns of Namibia; in 2017, the UNICEF discovered 53,000 new cases of Malaria.

The humanitarian aid to Namibia is substantial and providing necessary help in the aftermath of natural disasters such as food and shelter. Furthermore, humanitarian workers are helping the country manage and control its outbreaks of HIV and tuberculosis. As a result, the Republic of Namibia is seeing significant improvements throughout the country.

– Cassidy Dyce

Photo: Flickr

5 Development Projects in SyriaSyria, home to many diverse ethnic and religious groups, is a country that has lost hundreds of thousands of lives to war and violence. Because of this crisis, millions of people are displaced and in need of humanitarian assistance, and development projects in Syria aim to address this need.

Like many countries in the world, Syria is fighting extreme poverty. According to the United Nations Development Programme, four out of five Syrians live in poverty and 64.7 percent of the population lives in extreme poverty. The Arab region is the only region in the world where poverty has increased since 2010, rising from 28 percent in 2010 to 83.4 percent in 2015.

Here is a list of five development projects in Syria that may help relieve the nation’s citizens.

  1. Switzerland donates ambulances to Syria’s suffering population
    Switzerland financed twelve new ambulances to help the people of Syria facing the consequences of the war. Syria was in need of more ambulances as a result of the devastatingly high number of victims caused by the war, including attacks against hospitals. The vehicles were purchased through the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) in Dubai. This project was completed in 2017.
  2. Contribution to UNRWA’s Programme Budget 2017-2020
    The United Nations Relief and Works Agency is one of Switzerland’s key multilateral partners in the Middle East, addressing all kinds of humanitarian aid needs, including medical services, education, emergency assistance, healthcare and more. With more funds contributed to its budget, it has been able to work toward universal access to quality primary health care, basic education, relief and social services to refugees in need. This is an ongoing project expected to be completed by 2020.
  3. Swiss experts to U.N. agencies in the frame of the regional crises in the Middle East
    Through this completed project, experts from Switzerland were able to provide technical support and advice. The experts accounted for the provision of shelter in camps and noncamp settings for vulnerable displaced persons; for a multisector and multistakeholder strategy for cash-based response for IDPs, refugees and host communities; for the protection of the most vulnerable population, including children and youth; advice and strategic planning on activities in the domain of water; and support to the coordination of humanitarian interventions within the U.N. agencies and national/international actors.
  4. Contribution to UNRWA’s General Fund 2016
    Contributions to UNRWA’s 2016 General Fund allows for the sustaining of the agency’s humanitarian and human development programs, servicing over five million Palestine refugees and contributing to peace and stability in the Middle East. This completed project targeted Palestinian refugees living in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and the occupied Palestinian territory. Results included financial support enabling various programs in health and education, and management reforms including resource mobilization, ERP and more.
  5. UNDP- Livelihoods Restoration in Crisis- Affected Communities in Syria
    This completed two-year project worked on restoration interventions in Rural Damascus, Horns, Tartous and Latakia. The project created local economic opportunities and restored critical community infrastructure and services, improving access to hygiene and other basic needs.

These committed development projects in Syria leave marks of improvement and hope in a nation that has been ravaged by violence and poverty for far too long.

Julia Lee

Photo: Flickr

development projects in namibiaNamibia lies on the southwest coast of Africa and is comprised of both mountains and desert. The climate and terrain pose multiple challenges to its citizens. Nonetheless, nearly 2.3 million people still inhabit this country, 54.3 percent of which live in rural areas. Here are four development projects in Namibia, many led by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) working to make life easier for these citizens.

Scaling up Community Resilience to Climate Variability

Namibia has consistently faced problems over the years relating to water scarcity. In 2013, the country fought an intense drought that endangered one million of the 2.3 million people living there. As one of the driest countries in Southern Africa, Namibian farmers depend on rainy seasons to make a living. It did not arrive in 2013.

This UNDP project focuses on enhancing protective measures to ensure food and water security despite climate variations. The project focuses specifically on women and children. Close to 80 percent of the 4,000 involved households are led by women. The project also includes children from 75 Namibian schools.

The project will result in the use of sustainable agricultural practices and the restoration of wells and floodwater pools by the end of 2019.

Sustainable Management of Namibia’s Forested Lands (NAFOLA)

Namibia’s forests are vital to its citizens. In such a dry climate, forests promote biodiversity and water conservation, prevent soil erosion and provide food and resources for the Namibian people. Through this five-year project, the goal is to strengthen 11 community forests and promote community use and management of the resources NAFOLA provides.

This is one of the development projects in Namibia that also promotes sustainable agriculture and livestock practices. In turn, it aims to put less pressure on forest resources.

The Global Fund Grant to Combat Tuberculosis

Namibia ranks fourth on the list of countries worst affected by tuberculosis (TB). In 2014, 9,882 people were diagnosed with the disease, a 7 percent decrease from 2013.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria has given a $25.6 million grant to the Namibian Ministry of Health and Social Services to fight Tuberculosis within the country. This project includes enhancing patient quality of care and management of those living with TB and HIV as well as Multi-Drug Resistant TB.

Protected Areas System Strengthening to Sustainably Address New Management Challenges in Namibia (PASS Namibia)

Namibia is home to 21 Protected Areas consisting of forests, deserts and grasslands. These areas are also hosts to a diversity of species which includes mammals, birds and amphibians. Furthermore, 44 percent of this land is under conservation management.

This project was initiated in an effort to make Namibia a more advanced tourist destination. Not only does environmental tourism boost local economies, but it can also provide much-needed revenue to keep up with conservation efforts. The project also hopes to gain support for the implementation of an institutional framework by 2018 that will prolong conservation efforts.

The support of development projects in Namibia can make a significant difference for the citizens who live there. These projects will give Namibians a more sustainable and secure future.

– Megan Burtis

Photo: Flickr

Water Quality in NamibiaNamibia is a large, sparsely populated country on the south-west coast of Africa. It has enjoyed relative stability since gaining independence in 1990 after a struggle with the South African government. Unfortunately, the water quality in Namibia has been an issue for some time, with many avoiding the usage of tap water for drinking purposes and opting for bottled water instead.

In some cities, tap water is contaminated; in others, it may be safe to drink. In cities such as Keetmanshoop and Tsumeb, it is said that all water is considered contaminated and that it is recommended to bring all tap water to a rolling boil if you wish to drink, brush your teeth or make ice cubes with it. Otherwise, it is recommended to buy capped bottled water from reputable sellers.

In cities like Swakopmund, Walvis Bay and Windhoek, the water is considered as ‘may be safe to drink’ because the water is chlorinated. This means that locals can drink water from the tap without issue. Despite this, many still choose to avoid the water due to instances of some small strains of local E. coli being present in the water. This bacteria can cause diarrhea to new visitors.

As a result of water contamination, retail chains in Namibia, such as Pick ‘n Pay, Spar and Fruit and Veg, to make significant profits selling bottled water to consumers hesitant to drink the tap water.

However, in some shops, like the Pick n’ Play in Windhoek, tap water is labeled as ‘mineral water’ and sold to the consumers unknowingly. There are very little safety measures in place to protect the consumers from being misled by the retail shops that sell bottled water in Namibia.

While explaining the water quality in Namibia and how tap water is treated in cities, Maximilian Herzog of Omaruru Beverages, a leading bottled water company in the local market, said, “nobody controls water quality at the point of use – the tap at home.” This means that from the treatment point, water can flow kilometers through unclean and old pipelines. Water remains one of the most difficult products to bottle and transport through pipelines due to accidental contamination issues. Furthermore, high chlorine levels and unbalanced mineral contents in tap water lead to unpleasant tastes.

Herzog maintains that it is important that the consumer is clearly informed with appropriate labeling and packaging on what they intend to buy, whether it be mineral water or purified water.

In order for this issue to be addressed, it is imperative for the National Standards Institute (NSI) to create regulations for bottled water sales. This will ensure that consumers are no longer misled or in danger of drinking contaminated tap water. Until then, be aware of the water quality in Namibia.

Drew Fox

Photo: Flickr

 NamibiaNamibia gained its independence from South Africa in 1990. However, it is still dealing with the result of socioeconomic inequalities that came from the apartheid system during colonization. The government has achieved the UNDP Millennium Development Goal of cutting its poverty rate in half, but has unfortunately failed to eradicate hunger in Namibia.

Namibia has a Global Hunger Index (GHI) of 31.4, as reported by the International Food Policy Research Institute. This shows an alarming level of hunger in Namibia. What makes it more serious is the fact that Namibia has the lowest percentage reductions in GHI scores since 2000. Though child stunting, child wasting and child mortality have declined, undernourishment has increased to 42.3 percent. The factors that lead to hunger in Namibia include frequent droughts and flooding, putting pressure on the country’s agricultural and livestock production.

Chronic droughts, lack of agricultural land and water shortages result in crop failure. This means that agricultural production is severely low, even though about 70 percent of the population depends on the agricultural sector for their subsistence.

15.8 percent of Namibia’s population lives on less than $ 1.25 per day. Its economy is largely dependent on extraction and limited processing of minerals like diamonds, gold and zinc. It is also one of the largest producers of uranium in the world. However, only 10 percent of the labor force is employed in the mining sector.

Poverty is the most important of the causes of hunger in Namibia, limiting access to food. Another problem is that Namibia is heavily reliant on food imports (60 percent of all its food requirements), which means it is subject to high prices. The proportion of food insecure individuals was estimated at 25 percent in 2016.

Recently, the World Food Programme and Namibia’s National Planning Commission launched a five-year Country Strategic Plan (CSP) with an aim to end hunger in Namibia. The CSP is aligned with the Fifth National Development Plan and the Zero Hunger Roadmap, meant to achieve two strategic wins: enabling the vulnerable population to meet their food and nutrition requirement and ensuring government policies and programme designs are more informed of hunger issues. The support includes implementation of food-based safety net programmes, food management and monitoring system as well as capacity development to sustain the improvements and achieve zero hunger in Namibia.

Tripti Sinha

Photo: Flickr

Causes of Poverty in NamibiaAs the thirty-fourth largest country in the world, Namibia is home just 2.4 million people. While there was an 11 percent decline in poverty from 2001 to 2011, almost 600,000 people were still living in poverty. According to data from 2015, about 26.9 percent of the total population lived in poverty and 16.9 percent had HIV/AIDS. While poverty is caused by a variety of factors, here are three of the causes of poverty in Namibia.

  1. Agricultural and environmental factors
    Seventy percent of the population depends on agriculture. The country has fourteen regions, with many rural, agricultural regions. The agricultural regions do not fare well and the people there have had to deal with severe droughts as it is very arid. At these times, people cannot grow the food that they need to sell and to eat. Hunger and poverty are connected in this specific instance, showing that other issues are byproducts of poverty.In 2008, SKILLSHARE International began working with local organizations to create the Sustainable Livelihoods Project for Rural Communities in Namibia. Reports show that in order to reduce poverty, the country must understand subsistence farming. Some experts see this as the key to finding a way to reduce poverty because it affects so many lives in urban and rural areas.
  2. Socioeconomic factors
    The gap between the rich and the poor is seen through the separation of the northern and southern regions of Namibia. Large amounts of wealth are concentrated in the hands of the few. The Gini coefficient for Namibia, which measures inequality, shows that inequality is still pretty high at 0.6 (perfect equality is 0).Seventy percent of personal income taxes come from the top 10 percent of the population. This small group at the top has a lot more opportunity than those at the bottom who struggle to farm the arid land. There is a divide between the rural and urban areas. A large amount of the population lives in rural areas, while the few in the urban areas have more opportunities for jobs and economic success.Another socioeconomic factor is that the poor have little access to public services, which is something on which the Namibian government is starting to focus more. With more access to education and sanitation, the poor will be better off.

    To fight the causes of poverty in Namibia, the government started to change its fiscal policies. According to the World Bank, the fiscal policies adopted by Namibia have been successful thus far in reducing poverty.

    The World Bank described the policy as “a progressive social benefits and tax system,” which basically means that it creates higher taxes for the rich in order to provide the poor with more social benefits. This money can be used for healthcare, education, and for transfers, which give the poor money to use for living. The next step for the fiscal policies is to promote job creation to help the poor find employment.

  3. Health factors
    Namibia’s maternal mortality is 200 deaths per 100,000 births, and its neonatal mortality is 19 deaths per 1,000 births. Nonprofit organizations like Synergy work on reducing maternal and infant mortality. They also want to increase youth employment and assist agricultural growth in Namibia.

Over the past twenty years, poverty is in decline in the country of Namibia. But, the situation is far from perfect and there remain many causes of poverty in Namibia. Through the continued work of the government and effective aid organizations, more of the vulnerable communities in Namibia will be able to find a path to prosperity.

Emilia Beuger

Photo: Flickr

How to Help People in NamibiaLocated in Southwestern Africa, adjacent to Botswana, Zambia, Angola and South Africa, the Republic of Namibia is an arid and sparsely-populated nation of 2 million people. The country faces one of the highest HIV/AIDS rates in the world of approximately 13 percent, a chronic malnourishment rate of 20 percent and fluctuating levels of water supply.

Needless to say, the situation begs the question of how to help people in Namibia.

Firstly, and perhaps the most obvious, many charities based in Namibia work to improve the situation of the country’s population. For example, Books for Africa is a non-profit that provides books and educational materials to 48 countries across the continent. “Books for Africa is a simple idea, but its impact is transformative. For us, literacy is quite simply the bridge from misery to hope.” says former U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan.

Another method useful in answering the question of how to help people in Namibia is to support DAPP (Development Aid from People to People) Namibia, a not-for-profit organization based in Namibia that empowers local communities in a variety of ways. Some of DAPP’s initiatives include agricultural training networks and camps, creating programs responsible for combatting HIV/AIDS and increasing the availability of contraceptives across the nation. As an organization based in Namibia, DAPP is in a unique position to understand, identify and tackle national issues on a first-hand basis.

Finally, wildlife conservation is a key factor in understanding how to help people in Namibia. Preserving the country’s wildlife is indispensable to maintaining a steady tourism industry as many people come to the country to visit its wildlife and safari parks. Naankuse is a nonprofit based in Namibia that works to preserve the country’s rich and colorful variety of not only wildlife but indigenous cultures and people as well. Naankuse specifically focuses on three key areas: wildlife conservation, the preservation of national landscapes and support of rural communities. Supporting Naankuse will enable the country to protect its most valuable assets to one of the economy’s most valuable industries.

These are just a few examples of ways to get involved in helping to boost development and reduce poverty in Namibia.

Brad Tait

Photo: Flickr