Following­ the eruption of violence in 2018, Nicaragua, the poorest country in Central America, has seen its economic progress stagnate and its domestic life falter. The additional unrest is making Nicaraguans more vulnerable to violence and instability. While Nicaragua’s overall crime rate is low, certain areas, like the rape of minors and political violence, are high. These 10 facts about violence in Nicaragua provide a glimpse after one year of conflict.

10 Facts About Violence in Nicaragua

  1. Political violence occurred in 2018 in response to the government’s social security reforms. Protests occurred between April and July, and the government responded brutally. More than 300 people were killed and hundreds detained during three-month anti-government protests where citizens demanded that President Daniel Ortega — who has been in power since 2007 — step down. In the subsequent six months, the government arrested and jailed opposition leaders and those who challenged his authority, his human rights abuses, his consolidation of power and his low 10 percent approval rating.
  2. Sixty thousand Nicaraguans have sought asylum from the violence in Costa Rica. In July 2018, Costa Rica alone received about 200 requests by Nicaraguans for asylum per day. The U.N. is seeking to support countries who take Nicaraguan refugees.
  3. Violence between protesters and government-sponsored paramilitary groups disrupts access to resources. Roadblocks appear without apparent reason, mostly around cities, and limit the availability of food and fuel.
  4. Civil unrest continues unpredictably. Although protests are forbidden, they occur and government forces respond with violence. The poor infrastructure in parts of the country limits the potential of international assistance.
  5. Access to healthcare is limited due to the unrest. Government hospitals are understaffed and frequently deny treatment to suspected protestors. Ambulances are unreliable, denying treatment or not visiting certain areas.
  6. Sexual assault, especially against girls, is common. More than two-thirds of the 14,000 rapes reported between 1998 and 2008 were committed against girls under the age of 17, and nearly half of them were under the age of 14. More recent statistics during Ortega’s presidency are unavailable, but anecdotal reports suggest that gender-based violence is widespread. A stigma follows survivors of rape, but not perpetrators. The Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (IACHR) has expressed grave concern.
  7. Domestic violence against women is controversial in Nicaragua. The Nicaraguan Constitution contains both protections against and provisions for violence against women under certain circumstances, like marriage. Legal dialogue has fluctuated through the 2010s. In 2012, in response to high levels of femicide and little legal response, a women’s rights group pushed through Ley Integral Contra La Violencia Hacia Las Mujeres (Law 779) expanding the legal definition of violence against women, establishing specially-trained prosecutors to hear gender-based violence cases and further protect victims. Since then, 779 has been systematically weakened by a series of legislative and presidential decrees. Local conservative legislators and religious leaders see 779 as potentially destructive to families if women could seek reprisal for domestic violence. Although rape is illegal, domestic/intimate violence, child-marriage and dating violence is still high.
  8. Violence is hurting Nicaragua’s economic growth. Between 2014 and 2016, poverty in Nicaragua decreased from 29.6 to 24.9 percent and extreme poverty from 8.3 to 6.9 percent. But due to the social and political unrest since April 2018, the economy contracted in 2018 by 3.8 percent. The World Bank supported Nicaragua through the International Development Association (IDA), the World Bank’s fund for the poorest countries, to support poverty reduction measures in the country.
  9. Violent street crime is spotty, but regional, and is greater in urban areas after dark. Street crime is more prevalent in Managua, Puerto Cabezas, Bluefields, San Juan del Sur, Popoyo, El Transito and the Corn Islands.
  10. The homicide rate is low and falling. The homicide rate held steady with 15 in 100,000 people 2014-16, but it fell to 6 in 100,000 in 2018—far lower than comparable economies. Men commit homicide six times more frequently than women and people ages 15-26 are the most likely to commit homicides.

Heather Hughes
Photo: U.N.

How the U.S. Benefits from the Summer Work and Travel Program
When universities go on break for the summer, college students from the United States usually go on vacations, travel or rest. Many students from the rest of the world travel as well, but they have other various options. For example, the students can come to the United States on visas that allow them to work in the country for three to four months during their break from university.

Summer Work and Travel Program

The program that allows students to come and work in the U.S is called the Summer Work and Travel Program. This program is under the broader J-1 visa category. Initially introduced as a cultural exchange program, it started in 1961 with the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act. The J-1 type visa exchange is meant to encourage the “the interchange of persons, knowledge, and skills, in the fields of education, arts and science.” Over the last 10 years, over 310,000 individuals from 200 countries have visited the U.S. through the program.

What the Program Means for Participants

The students who choose to participate in the program are really serious about it. It requires a good deal of dedication to the process, some serious preparation and a considerable investment of funds to be able to apply for a visa. The requirements that participants need to meet include English language proficiency, full-time enrollment in a post-secondary educational institution and a secured job offer prior to traveling.

Toni Kovachev is a student from Bulgaria who has been to the United States three times as a J-1 participant. “Working in the states can be described as exhausting but having a lot of fun at the same time,” Kovachev shares with The Borgen Project. The decision to participate in the program came with his choice of a higher education institution.

Kovachev needed to find the means to be able to attend the American University in Bulgaria, a private liberal arts college, and the Summer Work and Travel Program made that possible. During his time in the U.S., he has been able to earn enough money for his tuition and improve his English language skills. Kovachev says, “It was a choice that changed my life and I am so glad that it happened that I went three summers already.”

The Summer Work and Travel program is an opportunity for international students to share their culture with different people and experience U.S. society and culture. These exchange of ideas, stories and ways of life are enriching for both sides. Being exposed to people from different backgrounds generates respect, understanding and tolerance towards others.

How the U.S. Benefits From Summer Work an Travel Program

Over the last two years, the program has been under scrutiny and criticism. The disapproval comes from the fear that visitors take job opportunities away from American youth. But these criticisms are misguided. J-1 students supplement the local economy during seasonal peak times or when American workers are not available. They help businesses to be more productive by being able to offer more and better services.

The students who obtain their visas to work in the U.S. for the summer usually occupy seasonal jobs in the hospitality sector. The majority of them are concentrated in the Southeast of the U.S. with Massachusetts and New York hosting the most J-1 students. Martha’s Vineyard, Provincetown and Nantucket experience an influx of visitors and tourists over the summer. Without international students cleaning hotel rooms, busing tables in restaurants and restocking supermarkets, businesses in those places would not be able to keep it up.

The program is beneficial for both the countries of origin of the J-1 students as well as the United States. A report commissioned by the Alliance for International Exchange shows that the majority of participants come to the U.S. to experience and learn about the way of life that then results in their positive opinion regarding the United States.

Almost all students reported that they believe they have obtained skills that would help them in the future. To add to that, 92.1 percent of employers agreed that the Summer Work and Travel Program participants improved the workplace. The estimated contribution of J-1 students to the economy in 2016 was around $509 million.

– Aleksandra Sirakova
Photo: Flickr

How to Help the World's Poor

Ways to Help the World’s Poor

Do you want to know some easy ways to help the world’s poor? Well, here are 10 simple ways to help the world’s poor, which can often be done without even having to leave your home!

 

1. Donate

One of the quickest and most obvious ways to help the world’s poor is to donate to charity. Click here to donate to The Borgen Project.

 

2. Call Congress

This way to help the world’s poor is surprisingly simple. Every person in the United States has 3 representatives in Congress (2 Senators and 1 Representative in the House). By calling these 3 peoples’ offices each week, individuals can show the Congressmen the issues that they care about. Calling your Congressmen is a simple process. Generally, an intern will answers the phone, or you can leave a message after hours.

The message you need to say is simple: “My name is ___, I live in ___, and I want to raise the funding for helping the world’s poor,” or something similar. As few as 7 people calling in can make a Congressman change his mind on a bill: Congressmen want those they are serving in the U.S. to be happy so if you let them know what you want, they are more likely to listen. Go here for more detailed instructions.

 

3. Inform Yourself

This is one of the simplest ways to help the world’s poor, and also it helps you to do the other things more effectively. Basically, all you need to do is stay informed on the issues. Pay attention to what is happening in Congress and read up on current poverty-related events. It may surprise you to find out that poverty has made some great strides in the past few years. Indeed, in the past 20 years, the world’s undernourished has decreased by 50%. Life expectancy has also increased by 1/3.

(Browse The Borgen Project to find out more interesting facts about poverty).

 

4. Build Buzz/Raise Awareness

Now that you’ve done your research, you can use your new information as tools to build buzz, or to raise the awareness of those around you. If you care about the world’s poor, you can be sure that other people do too, but may just be unaware of how they can help. You can share info on different poverty-fighting organizations with your colleagues, family, and friends (see: 1. Donate for ideas). You can also call in to radio shows, write to editors, speak locally about the cause, send ideas to the media, or anything else that may bring the idea of helping the world’s poor to the forefront of people’s vision and thoughts.

 

5. Social Media

Recently, social media has become one of the most fantastical ways a person can help the world’s poor (among other ventures). This is perhaps the easiest way to help, as well. Many Congressional leaders (your members of Congress) have Facebook pages, Twitters, or websites. All you need to do is either post on their pages to bring up the idea of helping the world’s poor, or post on your own about the various issues. Also, you can easily follow many different organizations, including The Borgen Project, and retweet them or post about them on Facebook or other websites. Overall, your voice will be heard. (The Social Media of Congress can be found here and here). (Also, follow us on Twitter!)

 

6. Get Political

Although you can call Congress, or post on their Facebook pages, there are other ways to help the world’s poor and to “get political.” If you are willing, you can always arrange a meeting with Congressional staffers to tell them what issues (like reducing global poverty) you are interested in. You can also mobilize those around you; just one person calling into Congress will make a difference, but if multiple people in an area call Congress about the same issue and around the same time, there will be a bigger effect. Finally, you can “bird dog” Congress, which means to go to where a legislator is speaking, and ask them publicly about poverty (For example, “What are you doing to help poverty?” or “Will you support helping reduce global poverty?”, etc).

 

7. Fundraising

Another one of the ways to help the world’s poor is fundraising. Contact people about various organizations to donate to, or use sites like Crowd Rise to start a campaign. You can also run marathons or accomplish other feats as a way to raise money, as long as you ask people to be your sponsor. You can also ask for donations to different charities rather than receiving gifts for your birthdays, weddings, or other events.

 

8. Be a Consumer with a Cause

One of the surprising ways to help the world’s poor is simply by being a consumer, or something who buys things. This can be done by buying products from websites that donate a portion of their proceeds to charity, or from nonprofit organizations that sell shirts or other merchandise to help the cause. The Borgen Project even has a Visa Card that has no annual fee, and some unique card designs. Basically, when possible, buy from places that will help the cause.

 

9. Arrange Events

One of the harder ways to help the world’s poor is arranging events. Of course, this does not need to be too difficult: you could host parties (or movie/TV show marathons with your friends!) and have a $5 (suggested donation) to get in. This can be done by living your life as normal, but adding in charity donation so that everyone can get involved. On the other hand, you can also host poverty-based events, or parties with the pure purpose of raising awareness on poverty and discussing its issues. Finally, you can have a “non-event” event, where instead of going out that night, everyone donates a certain amount and stays in.

 

10. Volunteer

Finally, one of the most difficult (but, arguably, most rewarding) ways to help the world’s poor is through volunteering. This can encompass many different things: volunteer for a political campaign, volunteer for a nonprofit organization, volunteer for a movement to fight poverty, or grab an internship. Personally, I am an intern writing for The Borgen Project; I do not get paid, but it helps get the message out to the world. Overall, you can find volunteer opportunities online (for example, through Idealist), but there are also local opportunities that may be available if you ask around.

To see even more easy ways to help the world’s poor, look here.

– Corina Balsamo

Source: The Borgen Project
Photo: Asheri


Weston_Volunteer_Openings
Interested in public policy advocacy to improve the lives of the world’s poor? The Borgen Project is currently hiring in Weston, Massachusetts for a variety of telecommute roles, all of which include advocacy for foreign policy change that will help those living in poverty.

The Borgen Project is a nonprofit organization that raises awareness of and works with our nation’s leaders to alleviate the problems caused by global poverty. We advocate on the national level for foreign policies that will better the lives of the world’s poor. For more information on the volunteer opportunities available in Weston, please see the list of openings below.

 

Weston Volunteer Openings

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Greensboro_Volunteer_OpportunitiesDo you live in Greensboro and wonder what you can do to improve your community and world? If so, the options below that help make a difference in the world might interest you.

The best way to find volunteer opportunities in Greensboro is through VolunteerMatch, a volunteer search engine that can be set specifically for Greensboro allows you to pick the dates you want, type of work you are interested in and what areas are the best for you.

However, if you are looking for a way to make a difference in the global atmosphere while working in Greensboro, The Borgen Project is the place for you.

The Borgen Project is looking for flexible volunteers who are passionate about decreasing global poverty. The Borgen Project works on the political level, while also advocating to those around us to increase awareness. To achieve change, volunteers are vital to the organization.

The positions below are currently open for volunteers.

 

Greensboro Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week

Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.

Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week

This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

z1 splash
Do you live in Fargo, North Dakota and wonder what you can do to improve your community and world? If so, the options below that help make a difference in the world might interest you.

If you are looking for a way to make a difference in the global atmosphere while working in Fargo, The Borgen Project is the place for you.

The Borgen Project is looking for flexible volunteers who are passionate about decreasing global poverty. The Borgen Project works on the political level, while also advocating to those around us to increase awareness. To achieve change, volunteers are vital to the organization.

The positions below are currently open for volunteers.

 

Fargo Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week

Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.

Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week

This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week

This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!

How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]


South_Beach_Volunteer_Openings
Want to get involved in combating the effects of global poverty from South Beach, Florida? The Borgen Project, a nonprofit organization focusing on advocacy for the world’s poor, is hiring in South Beach for a number of telecommute opportunities.

Join a team of volunteers and interns across the country interested in mobilizing for change in foreign policy! For more information on the opportunities available in South Beach, please review the descriptions of positions below.

 

South Beach Volunteer Openings

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

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Looking to get involved in the global poverty crisis? The Borgen Project is currently hiring remote volunteers in Los Altos, California. Founded in 2003 by Clint Borgen, The Borgen Project acts as a voice for the world’s poor. This non-profit organization combats global poverty by advocating for the world’s poor on the political level. For more information about The Borgen Project, please visit our website. For more details about the requirements for each position, please review the list below.

 

Los Altos Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.

– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.

Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]org.

 


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer and college students.

Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program

 


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.

– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.

Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]

 


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.

– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.

Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

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Do you live in Morgantown? Are you interested in combating global poverty?

The Borgen Project is hiring in Morgantown, West Virginia! The Borgen Project is hiring national volunteers that can work remotely. Your role as a volunteer can help The Borgen Project educate the public or influence legislators about global poverty. For more information on how to volunteer in Morgantown for The Borgen Project, please see the openings below.

Morgantown Volunteer Opportunities

 

Advocate

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great entry-level volunteer position for someone looking to be part of The Borgen Project. Advocates can operate from anywhere in the U.S.
Key Responsibilities
– Attend one (30-60 minute) national conference call every week (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Serve as an ambassador for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues and ways people can help.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Represent The Borgen Project in your city. Attend events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
Qualifications:
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]


 

Regional Director

Location: Nationwide (Telecommute Volunteer Role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 6-months
Hours: 4-6 hours per week
Regional Directors operate independently from home and maintain contact with The Borgen Project’s Seattle office. Regional Directors sign a 6-month contract. The position is volunteer and is roughly 4-6 hours per week. Regional Directors attend a conference call every Monday evening. Regional Directors come from many diverse backgrounds, some of which include a news anchor, veteran, banker, teacher, relief worker, political staffer, sales manager, programmer, and college students.
Key Responsibilities:
– Attend one (30-60 minute) conference call every week with the President of The Borgen Project and Regional Directors from across the United States (5PM PDT, 6PM MDT, 7PM CDT, 8PM EDT).
– Meet with local congressional leaders and lobby for legislation that improves living conditions for those living on less than $1 per day.
– Mobilize people in your community to contact their congressional leaders to support poverty reduction legislation.
– Manage and implement fundraising campaigns.
– Build a network of people engaged in the cause.
– Serve as The Borgen Project’s ambassador in your city.
Qualifications:
– Basic understanding of U.S. Politics and international development.
– Highly organized with the ability to prioritize multiple functions and tasks while managing their work time efficiently.
– Strong team player that loves to bring new ideas to the table.
– Ability to demonstrate frequent independent judgment with decisiveness.
– Excellent overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Learn more about the Regional Director Program


 

Writer

Location: Nationwide (telecommute volunteer role)
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 10-15 hours per week
This is a 12-week, part-time volunteer role. The selected candidate will be able to work from home and pick their own schedule, but must meet weekly deadlines.
Key Responsibilities:
– Write 3 articles per week for The Borgen Project’s blog and Magazine. Writing will focus on quality, but also improving search ranking.
– Assist with advocacy and fundraising.
Qualifications: Strong research and writing skills. Must be able to work independently and meet deadlines with very little supervision. Experience writing SEO friendly content is helpful, but not required.
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume and two writing samples to [email protected]


 

Youth Ambassador (High School Students)

Location: Nationwide
Salary: Unpaid
Duration: 3-months
Hours: 4-hours per week
This is a great volunteer position for high school students looking to get involved in politics, global development, and the good fight against global poverty. Youth Ambassadors can operate independently or in groups from anywhere in the U.S.
Key Responsibilities:
– Serve as an ambassador to your school and community for the world’s poor. Build awareness of the issues around global poverty and ways people can help.
– Attend and hold events and engage people in the cause.
– Contact congressional leaders in support of key poverty-reduction programs.
– Create a club at school or in one’s community to bring more people together in the battle for the underdog (suggested).
– Create a network of close friends and relatives to engage in The Borgen Project’s cause through information and issue messaging.
Qualifications:
– Good overall communication skills: oral, written, presentation.
– Ability to self-manage and prioritize assignments.
– Commitment to advocating for global poverty reduction.
– Willingness to learn and a drive to succeed!
How to Apply: To apply, send your resume to [email protected]

Ella Cady

Sources: The Borgen Project

news
Everyone has heard the phrase “ignorance is bliss” when they were younger. And it’s not a phrase that anyone can fully understand until they are suddenly faced with the gift of knowledge, and the world seems to fall out from underneath them.

Because it really is bliss, to live blandly and emptily and unaware of the world around you.

It’s hard for anyone to force themselves to become informed because it seems that by choosing to learn more about the world, what a person is really forced to do is to learn about all of the bad in the world and to be bombarded with negative images of all the horrific things that happen on the planet we inhabit every day.

Sometimes it feels like a wonder that anyone reads the news or tries to keep up with the times — every day it’s something new and uniquely terrible.

And it doesn’t help that sometimes all of this tragedy does is reinforce the idea that an individual is like a tiny drop in a massive bucket, not capable of making much of a difference. So we don’t educate ourselves because all it will do is make us sad, and what can a single person do anyway?

As Steven Shepherd states in a scholastic article on the perpetuation of ignorance, “Maintaining unfamiliarity is an ideal way to protect the psychologically comfortable (even if inaccurate) belief that [someone else] is taking care of the problem.”

The average consumer of news underestimates how much of a difference they are able to make but not the power of other individuals to make a difference. By assuming that other people will take care of the world’s problems, they effectively admit that it is only through the power of people that change will be affected.

The fact of the matter is, in some sense, we are all individual drops in a bucket. But it is only if every drop agrees to do its part that we can and will make the world a better place. As Edward Everett Hale once said, “I am only one, but I am one. I cannot do everything, but I can do something. And I will not let what I cannot do interfere with what I can do.”

Once a person decides to make an active effort to change the world, then possibilities start to open up. “Seek and you shall find,” as the saying goes. There are causes and charities that are always accepting donations (use a website like Guidestar.com to verify the legitimacy of the organization, and check to see how much of their money goes toward the cause and how much to areas like administration).

There are rallies to attend, there is awareness to raise, there are petitions to sign, and there is understanding to spread. Because, though ignorance may be bliss, knowledge is power, and compassion is the most vital ingredient of our humanity.

The Borgen Project itself is a perfect resource for finding ways for the informed person to make a difference. Our “30 Ways to Right a Wrong” page is full of excellent ideas for anyone who wants to start making an active difference.

Pretending the problems of the world don’t exist won’t make the problems any better. In contrast, every individual who decides he or she is going to do what he or she can to right wrongs will make the problems better.

So yes, depressing news stories continue to flood the media waves can be depressing, however we should still pay attention:

  • Because it’s our responsibility to uphold the principles of humanity.
  • Because it is the only way that we can start to address problems.
  • Because by breaking out of our false sense of security, we can create a real sense of security all throughout the world. Our individual bubbles of privilege can be expanded to include all of the people across the earth.

Emily Dieckman

Sources: Before It’s News, APA
Photo: Pittsburgh Parent